High Adventure Team


The WLACC High Adventure Team (HAT) is an all volunteer organization that provides:

highadventure

WLACC High Adventure Team Website

All of the awards, training information and resources are available on the HAT website: www.wlacchat.org (leaves WLACC-council maintained website)

Youth Protection Training (Effective 9/1/17)
Effective September 1, 2017, Youth Protection Training will be required for all adult leaders at the time of registration. Paper applications from new leaders must be accompanied by a Youth Protection Training completion certificate, which must be filed with the application.
Because completion of YPT is now required for all leaders at the time of registration, unit leaders must obtain copies of the completion certificates from the leaders who register online before approving their application.
With the upcoming renewal cycle, the Internet Rechartering system will be updated so that units cannot submit the registration renewal of any adult who does not have current YPT as of the effective date of the renewal. Completion of YPT as part of the online registration system will be required in a future update. Additionally, council registrars will no longer be able to override the registration system to register any leader whose Youth Protection Training is not current.
Effective for the 2018 BSA summer camp season, any adult accompanying a Boy Scout troop to a residence camp or other Scouting activity lasting 72 hours or more must be registered as a leader, including completion of a CBC and YPT, even if they are the parent of a youth on the trip.
Please Note: Although YPT is strongly encouraged for adults attending any overnight activity, at this time, the requirement applies only to individual adults staying three or more nights at a resident camp.

Membership Fee Increase (Effective 12/1/17)
The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Scout Law.
To do this — while delivering the nation’s foremost youth development program — the BSA must remain vigilant in controlling costs. Although we have been successful in reducing our expenditures in many areas, it has become necessary to evaluate our annual membership fees.
Based on feedback from both volunteers and employees, the BSA membership fee will increase to $33 for all registered youth and adult leaders, effective December 1, 2017.
Membership fees support the services that are necessary to provide Scouting to youth from 7 to 21 years of age. From education to high-adventure experiences you can’t get anyplace else, the BSA provides unique growth opportunities at a great value.
Services include primary liability coverage for all volunteer leaders and chartered organizations, ongoing advances in technology, fundraising support, new program development and membership recruiting strategies, and support materials. In 2016 alone, the BSA served 2.3 million youth members through approximately 270 local councils across the United States and its territories.
With the help of all of our volunteers and Scouting parents, we will continue accomplishing incredible things for young people and the communities we serve. Please see the attached “2017 Membership Fee Increase FINAL.docx” for more information, including a Q&A section.

2017 Membership Fee Increase  Q&A

The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

To do this — while delivering the nation’s foremost youth development program — the BSA must remain vigilant in controlling costs. Although we have been successful in reducing our expenditures in many areas, it has become necessary to evaluate our annual membership fees.

Based on feedback from both volunteers and employees, the BSA membership fee will increase to $33 for all registered youth and adult leaders, effective December 1, 2017.
Membership fees support the services that are necessary to provide Scouting to youth from 7 to 21 years of age. From education to high-adventure experiences you can’t get anyplace else, the BSA provides unique growth opportunities at a great value.

Services include primary liability coverage for all volunteer leaders and chartered organizations, ongoing advances in technology, fundraising support, new program development and membership recruiting strategies, and support materials. In 2016 alone, the BSA served 2.3 million youth members through approximately 270 local councils across the United States and its territories.

With the help of all of our volunteers and Scouting parents, we will continue accomplishing incredible things for young people and the communities we serve.

Questions and Answers:

1. Why are you increasing the membership fee? What is the additional money from the fees going to be used for?

To deliver the Scouting program to our 2.3 million youth members, it is occasionally necessary for the organization to increase membership fees to offset rising costs. As a result, the BSA is increasing our membership fee to $33 for all registered Scouts and adult members effective December 1, 2017.

Membership fees support the services that are necessary to provide Scouting programs to a growing number of youth. Services include ongoing advances in technology, council visits to assist in fundraising, program development and membership campaigns, liability insurance costs, and administrative costs. It is important that we continue to maintain a strong financial position in the future to support and grow Scouting.

2. What is directly contributing to the need for this increase?

There are a variety of factors taken into consideration, all of which have led to an increased cost of doing business.

3. When will the increase go into effect?

The membership fee change for all registered youth and adult leaders will go into effect December 1, 2017. This change will affect Cub Scout packs, Boy Scout troops, Venturing crews, Sea Scout ships, and Exploring posts/clubs. However, it will NOT apply to LDS-sponsored units, nor to those units with council-paid memberships. Note: All November and December 2017 recharters will have to renew at this new rate (since November recharter renewal actually spans from December 1, 2017, to November 30, 2018).

4. Does the BSA increase membership fees often?

There have been 10 fee increases in the organization’s history. Since 1969, the BSA has increased our fee, on average, every five years. The last membership increase took effect on January 1, 2014, and, prior to that, in 2010.

5. How much does it cost to be a Boy Scout?

All youth and adults who wish to become a member or leader of the Boy Scouts of America must pay the annual membership fee. Beyond that, families incur additional costs related to uniforms and the activities of their individual units.

6. Will the fee for Cub Scouts, Exploring, and Venturing/Sea Scouts increase as well?

Yes. This change will affect Cub Scout packs, Boy Scout troops, Venturing crews, Sea Scout ships, and Exploring posts/clubs. However, it will NOT apply to LDS-sponsored units, nor to those units with council-paid memberships.

7. Who gets the membership fee?

Local councils collect — and forward to the National Council — membership fees from each youth and adult who wishes to become a member of the Boy Scouts of America.

8. How is the National Council funded?

The National Council is funded through membership and service fees, investments, Boys’ Life magazine subscriptions, sales of uniforms and equipment, fees from national high-adventure bases, and contributions from individuals.

9. What does the National Council do for Scouting on the local level?

The BSA’s National Council provides program materials and support for approximately 270 local councils that administer the Scouting program, with each covering a specific geographic territory. The following are the key functions of the National Council:

 Provide training to local council volunteers and staff
 Maintain a national training center at Philmont Scout Ranch
 Develop and maintain four year-round national high-adventure bases and execute national events (jamborees, National Eagle Scout Association and Order of the Arrow conferences, and National Council meetings)
 Continue our leadership role in protecting our youth by providing youth protection resources, training, and criminal background checks for all registered volunteers and staff
 Provide local councils with program as well as tools for camp and office planning and evaluation, extensive financial counseling, planned giving and fundraising information, and professional personnel support
 Coordinate a communications network through magazines and literature (handbooks, merit badge pamphlets, brochures, training materials, and professional development training), including providing Scouting magazine to all registered leaders
 Make available uniforms, equipment, and program supplies
 Maintain and develop new relationships with chartered organizations that use the Scouting program (religious institutions, civic organizations, labor unions, professional organizations, business, and industry)
 Serve in a leadership role with Scouting associations in other countries as a member of the World Scout Conference
 Set and maintain program standards (e.g., advancement, health and safety, etc.) to ensure consistency of the brand throughout councils across the country

10. With the increase in membership fees, is Scouting still a good value?

The BSA has always taken into consideration the cost of delivering the Scouting program and has worked to keep our fees reasonable.

When you compare the BSA to other youth-serving organizations, we provide unique growth opportunities at a great value. The following are costs associated with other youth activities:

 Tackle football, $142: In Plano, Texas, second- through sixth-graders who play tackle football pay $140 for a three-month season. That fee doesn’t include equipment.
 Youth orchestra, $1,000: Members of the prestigious Los Angeles Youth Orchestra pay $100 to audition, $1,000 annually (if accepted), and must buy their own instruments.
 Select soccer, $400: In Cleveland, select youth soccer players ages 15 to 18 pay $400 a season, plus $180 for uniforms.
 Youth basketball, $525: In Queens, N.Y., boys ages 8 to 13 pay $525 a year, not including uniforms.
 4-H program, $25: Participants of the 4-H program in College Station, Texas, pay $25 a year, not including fees for individual activities.

From education to high-adventure, the Boy Scouts of America provides unique growth opportunities at a great value and we want all eligible youth to receive these benefits and participate in Scouting.

Youth Protection Training (Effective 9/1/17)
Effective September 1, 2017, Youth Protection Training will be required for all adult leaders at the time of registration. Paper applications from new leaders must be accompanied by a Youth Protection Training completion certificate, which must be filed with the application.
Because completion of YPT is now required for all leaders at the time of registration, unit leaders must obtain copies of the completion certificates from the leaders who register online before approving their application.
With the upcoming renewal cycle, the Internet Rechartering system will be updated so that units cannot submit the registration renewal of any adult who does not have current YPT as of the effective date of the renewal. Completion of YPT as part of the online registration system will be required in a future update. Additionally, council registrars will no longer be able to override the registration system to register any leader whose Youth Protection Training is not current.
Effective for the 2018 BSA summer camp season, any adult accompanying a Boy Scout troop to a residence camp or other Scouting activity lasting 72 hours or more must be registered as a leader, including completion of a CBC and YPT, even if they are the parent of a youth on the trip.
Please Note: Although YPT is strongly encouraged for adults attending any overnight activity, at this time, the requirement applies only to individual adults staying three or more nights at a resident camp.

Membership Fee Increase (Effective 12/1/17)
The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Scout Law.
To do this — while delivering the nation’s foremost youth development program — the BSA must remain vigilant in controlling costs. Although we have been successful in reducing our expenditures in many areas, it has become necessary to evaluate our annual membership fees.
Based on feedback from both volunteers and employees, the BSA membership fee will increase to $33 for all registered youth and adult leaders, effective December 1, 2017.
Membership fees support the services that are necessary to provide Scouting to youth from 7 to 21 years of age. From education to high-adventure experiences you can’t get anyplace else, the BSA provides unique growth opportunities at a great value.
Services include primary liability coverage for all volunteer leaders and chartered organizations, ongoing advances in technology, fundraising support, new program development and membership recruiting strategies, and support materials. In 2016 alone, the BSA served 2.3 million youth members through approximately 270 local councils across the United States and its territories.
With the help of all of our volunteers and Scouting parents, we will continue accomplishing incredible things for young people and the communities we serve. Please see the attached “2017 Membership Fee Increase FINAL.docx” for more information, including a Q&A section.

2017 Membership Fee Increase  Q&A

The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

To do this — while delivering the nation’s foremost youth development program — the BSA must remain vigilant in controlling costs. Although we have been successful in reducing our expenditures in many areas, it has become necessary to evaluate our annual membership fees.

Based on feedback from both volunteers and employees, the BSA membership fee will increase to $33 for all registered youth and adult leaders, effective December 1, 2017.
Membership fees support the services that are necessary to provide Scouting to youth from 7 to 21 years of age. From education to high-adventure experiences you can’t get anyplace else, the BSA provides unique growth opportunities at a great value.

Services include primary liability coverage for all volunteer leaders and chartered organizations, ongoing advances in technology, fundraising support, new program development and membership recruiting strategies, and support materials. In 2016 alone, the BSA served 2.3 million youth members through approximately 270 local councils across the United States and its territories.

With the help of all of our volunteers and Scouting parents, we will continue accomplishing incredible things for young people and the communities we serve.

Questions and Answers:

1. Why are you increasing the membership fee? What is the additional money from the fees going to be used for?

To deliver the Scouting program to our 2.3 million youth members, it is occasionally necessary for the organization to increase membership fees to offset rising costs. As a result, the BSA is increasing our membership fee to $33 for all registered Scouts and adult members effective December 1, 2017.

Membership fees support the services that are necessary to provide Scouting programs to a growing number of youth. Services include ongoing advances in technology, council visits to assist in fundraising, program development and membership campaigns, liability insurance costs, and administrative costs. It is important that we continue to maintain a strong financial position in the future to support and grow Scouting.

2. What is directly contributing to the need for this increase?

There are a variety of factors taken into consideration, all of which have led to an increased cost of doing business.

3. When will the increase go into effect?

The membership fee change for all registered youth and adult leaders will go into effect December 1, 2017. This change will affect Cub Scout packs, Boy Scout troops, Venturing crews, Sea Scout ships, and Exploring posts/clubs. However, it will NOT apply to LDS-sponsored units, nor to those units with council-paid memberships. Note: All November and December 2017 recharters will have to renew at this new rate (since November recharter renewal actually spans from December 1, 2017, to November 30, 2018).

4. Does the BSA increase membership fees often?

There have been 10 fee increases in the organization’s history. Since 1969, the BSA has increased our fee, on average, every five years. The last membership increase took effect on January 1, 2014, and, prior to that, in 2010.

5. How much does it cost to be a Boy Scout?

All youth and adults who wish to become a member or leader of the Boy Scouts of America must pay the annual membership fee. Beyond that, families incur additional costs related to uniforms and the activities of their individual units.

6. Will the fee for Cub Scouts, Exploring, and Venturing/Sea Scouts increase as well?

Yes. This change will affect Cub Scout packs, Boy Scout troops, Venturing crews, Sea Scout ships, and Exploring posts/clubs. However, it will NOT apply to LDS-sponsored units, nor to those units with council-paid memberships.

7. Who gets the membership fee?

Local councils collect — and forward to the National Council — membership fees from each youth and adult who wishes to become a member of the Boy Scouts of America.

8. How is the National Council funded?

The National Council is funded through membership and service fees, investments, Boys’ Life magazine subscriptions, sales of uniforms and equipment, fees from national high-adventure bases, and contributions from individuals.

9. What does the National Council do for Scouting on the local level?

The BSA’s National Council provides program materials and support for approximately 270 local councils that administer the Scouting program, with each covering a specific geographic territory. The following are the key functions of the National Council:

 Provide training to local council volunteers and staff
 Maintain a national training center at Philmont Scout Ranch
 Develop and maintain four year-round national high-adventure bases and execute national events (jamborees, National Eagle Scout Association and Order of the Arrow conferences, and National Council meetings)
 Continue our leadership role in protecting our youth by providing youth protection resources, training, and criminal background checks for all registered volunteers and staff
 Provide local councils with program as well as tools for camp and office planning and evaluation, extensive financial counseling, planned giving and fundraising information, and professional personnel support
 Coordinate a communications network through magazines and literature (handbooks, merit badge pamphlets, brochures, training materials, and professional development training), including providing Scouting magazine to all registered leaders
 Make available uniforms, equipment, and program supplies
 Maintain and develop new relationships with chartered organizations that use the Scouting program (religious institutions, civic organizations, labor unions, professional organizations, business, and industry)
 Serve in a leadership role with Scouting associations in other countries as a member of the World Scout Conference
 Set and maintain program standards (e.g., advancement, health and safety, etc.) to ensure consistency of the brand throughout councils across the country

10. With the increase in membership fees, is Scouting still a good value?

The BSA has always taken into consideration the cost of delivering the Scouting program and has worked to keep our fees reasonable.

When you compare the BSA to other youth-serving organizations, we provide unique growth opportunities at a great value. The following are costs associated with other youth activities:

 Tackle football, $142: In Plano, Texas, second- through sixth-graders who play tackle football pay $140 for a three-month season. That fee doesn’t include equipment.
 Youth orchestra, $1,000: Members of the prestigious Los Angeles Youth Orchestra pay $100 to audition, $1,000 annually (if accepted), and must buy their own instruments.
 Select soccer, $400: In Cleveland, select youth soccer players ages 15 to 18 pay $400 a season, plus $180 for uniforms.
 Youth basketball, $525: In Queens, N.Y., boys ages 8 to 13 pay $525 a year, not including uniforms.
 4-H program, $25: Participants of the 4-H program in College Station, Texas, pay $25 a year, not including fees for individual activities.

From education to high-adventure, the Boy Scouts of America provides unique growth opportunities at a great value and we want all eligible youth to receive these benefits and participate in Scouting.

The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) deeply appreciates our relationship with the LDS Church, one that began in the earliest years of the Scouting movement when the LDS Church became the first partner to sponsor Scouting in the United States.

The BSA offers a variety of programs from Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts to STEM Scouts, Exploring and Venturing, and our chartered partners are in the best position to decide which programs most appropriately meet the needs of the youth they serve.

Although thousands of youth and leaders who participate in Venturing crews nationwide embrace and support the program, we recognize that not all programs are a perfect fit for all partners.

We anticipate that many youth from the LDS Church will continue to participate in Scouting beyond the age of 14 as young men work to earn the Eagle Scout rank.

The BSA values our ongoing partnership with the LDS Church in Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts programming and look forward to our continued efforts to extend the benefits of Scouting to as many youth and families as possible.

Approximately 330,000 youth in the LDS Church are served by the Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts program today. In fact, LDS Cub Scout packs consistently grow in membership year after year.

As one of the nation’s largest and most prominent values-based youth development organizations, the Boy Scouts of America is deeply heartened by all of our religious partners’ ongoing commitment to Scouting which enables us to serve 2.3 million youth each year. For more information on the long-standing LDS-BSA partnership, visit http://www.scouts100.lds.org/.

To learn more, please read these Questions and Answers about Changes to the Young Men Program from the LDS Church.

Membership Resources

Social Media Playbook

The BSA Social Media Playbook will be your guide as you use social media to communicate, recruit, retain, and inspire those in your community. Learn about best practices, recent trends, and the tools available to ensure your success.

Social Media Guidelines

The Boy Scouts of America has developed the following guidelines and policies to help you safely navigate the use of social media channels for your council or unit. These guidelines are a complement to the BSA’s existing Youth Protection policies and training.

WLACC Social Media Best Practices 


To help you develop the right tactics for your unit, we’ve put together these best practices and examples collected from fellow Scouters in our council. You can also reach out rcpeterson@scouting.org

Social Media Images

Access high-quality branded photos, profile images, and cover images to share on your council or unit social media accounts.

BSA Brand Identity Guide

Consider it your compass to the Boy Scout brand. Also, be sure to use the BSA Color Guide.

BeAScout.org

It is crucial that your unit keeps its information up-to-date on BeAScout.org to insure potential members are able to contact you. Click here for a step-by-step guide on updating your unit’s information.

Unit PR Brochure

Use local public relations to ensure Scouting continues to grow in your community. This brochure will guide you in developing a simple, effective strategy to help tell your Scouting story to the communities you serve. Download it now to get started!

Unit PR PowerPoint

Making a presentation on the Unit PR concept? Use these slides as your guide.

Press Release Guidelines and Template

Click here to view instructional materials on how to create effective press releases.

Talent Release Form

Use this form to obtain permission to use photographs or audio/video recordings of people (permission must be obtained from a parent or guardian for individuals under the age of 18).Click here.

 

2017 Fall Recruiting Playbook

Unit Level Playbook

2017 Cub Scout Lion Pilot Information

2017 WLACC Lion Pilot Application

Lion Pilot Resources

Lion Guide & Lion Parent Orientation Video

Youth & Adult Online Application Resources

Online Registration Council & District Guidebook

Online Registration Unit Guidebook

Webelos to Boy Scout Transition Plan

Sample Plan Template

 

 

Starting a New Scout Unit

Strengthening Youth Through Scouting

Strengthening Youth Through Scouting

This brochure is designed to give an overview of Scouting with special information for potential chartered organizations. It’s a great conversation starter and leave-behind piece. Download as a PDF, or download PowerPoint version to customize as needed for presentation purposes. Printed copies of this brochure can be ordered from bin storage through the National Distribution Center.

Download PDF

Download customizable PDF

Download PowerPoint presentation

Strengthening Youth Through Cub Scouting

  • Strengthening Youth Through Cub Scouting

    This brochure gives an overview of the Cub Scouting program designed for boys in the first through fifth grades.  Download this PDF to find out more on how Cub Scouting gives boys the opportunity to see and learn things that can’t be found anywhere else.  And most importantly, have fun!

    Flier 1

    Fliers 2 (Editable)

    Images for social media

    Strengthening Youth Through Boy Scouting

    Strengthening Youth Through Boy Scouting

    This brochure provides details on the Boy Scouting program designed year-round for boys in fifth grade through high school.  In Boy Scouting, young men will go places, test themselves, and have one-of-a-kind adventures. Download this PDF to find out more on how Boy Scouting helps build character and instill values for a lifetime.

    Flier 1

    Fliers 2 (editable)

    Images for social media

  • Strengthening Youth Through Venturing

    Strengthening Youth Through Venturing

    Venturing is a development program for young men and women ages 14 to 20 (or age 13 if they have completed the eighth grade). Venturing focuses on adventure, leadership, personal growth, and service. Download this PDF to find out more on how Venturing helps young people develop into responsible, caring adults while having fun!

    Flier 1

    Fliers 2 (editable)

    Images for social media

  • How to set up an Instagram page. Click Here (make sure to give login to multiple people for 2 deep leadership). 

National Jamboree


The Boy Scout National Jamboree is held every four years. Because of the age restrictions, most Scouts only get one opportunity to attend this unbelievable event as a Boy Scout. So if you are interested, don’t put this off!! What is a Jamboree?

In 1916, Sir Robert Baden-Powell, founder of the Scouting movement, knew what success looked like for the 10th anniversary of Scouting. It was the sight of thousands of youth gathered together to celebrate. The jamboree was born! In his words, “The secret of its growth lies in that indeterminate force which we only know as the ‘Scout Spirit,’ and grow it has!” Since 1937, more than 654,000 Scouts and leaders have shared the jamboree experience and hiked the trails, paths, and roadways at previous national Scout jamborees. Now, it’s your turn to celebrate! It is the opportunity of a lifetime, one you will never forget. DON’T MISS OUT on this special moment in time! A jamboree is truly a Scouts mountain-top experience.

Tour and Travel Plans

Troop “A”—The “Behind the Scenes of America – The GO BIG GET WILD TOUR”

Departs Los Angeles July 8th, 2013.

This exciting tour focuses on visiting behind the scenes of manufacturing, research, entertainment, government, military, educational and other select locations not normally accessible to the public. We will be touring amazing and historic places in the Philadelphia area, Washington, D.C., Orlando, Florida, Cape Canaveral, Florida and the Bahamas. A few highlights include touring the US. Mint, Independence Hall, Hershey’s Chocolate World & Theme Park, Smithsonian Museums, Ford’s Theater, White House, Ft. McHenry, Baltimore Orioles Game, Monticello, US Naval Academy, Harley Davidson Motorcycle Factory and more. This once and a lifetime tour will also visit the Islands of Adventure Amusement Park (Hogwart’s Castle & Village and Harry Potter Adventure Ride), The Animal Kingdom Park (behind the scenes), Gatorland and includes a tour of the Kennedy Space Center (with special lunch with an astronaut) plus a cruise to the Bahamas to BSA reef snorkel and more!!! Parents and families may join in on the fun and attend the portion of this troop’s tour beginning on July 24th, 2013 in Florida and the Bahamas, for a separate price to be determined. Troop A returns to Los Angeles on July 31st, 2013.

Cost $5,995.00 (app. $375 per month)

Troop “B”—The “Passport Required Tour”

Departs July 5th, 2013 with visits to the CN Tower, Royal Ontario Museum, Casa Loma Castle, Niagara Falls, the Baseball Hall of Fame, key sites in New York (Nintendo World, 9/11 Memorial, and a Broadway show), Philadelphia, Lancaster to check out the Amish way of life, Hershey (Founders Hall, Hershey’s Chocolate World), and Gettysburg Visitor Center and Museum. Then off to the 2013 Jamboree at the Summit Bechtel Scout Reserve, West Virginia. After the Jamboree we will check out the Hazy Center and then catch an afternoon flight home.

Cost $5,830(app. $360 per month)

Venturing Crew “E”—The “Ad—Venture Tour”

Departs July 5, 2013 to Philadelphia, PA. We’ll take the historical Spirit of ‘76 Ghost Tour, explore the Constitution Tour on a cool Segway, visit Amish Country in Lancaster, and participate in 150th Anniversary Gettysburg re– enactment. Then on to New York City to sail aboard the Clipper City, 158 foot schooner in the Manhattan Bay, visit the Empire State Building, Central Park Bike Tour, 911 Memorial, Times Square, and a Broadway show! Next, we’ll visit The Smithsonian, Washington Monument, Lincoln Memorial, and the Mall in Washington DC. Then meet with a Congressman and a private tour of the Capital. Then explore the Potomac river around Washington, DC on a kayak. Take a trip through time to Colonial Williamsburg with a day of fun at Bush Gardens. Get on board The Batteau, the re-enactment of Tom Sawyer’s overnight boat tour to a private island in Lynchburg, VA. Finally, we’ll have 10 exciting days at the Jamboree where the Venturers will get to repel, scuba dive, rock climb, white water raft, and many more fun activities. After the Jamboree we’ll visit Winston-Salem and Raleigh, NC before we return home on July 25th, 2013.

Cost $4,788(app. $285 per month)

Boy Scout High Adventure Awards


hataward

The High Adventure Team administers a supplementary patch program for Boy Scouts.

There are rules and requirements to earning these cool patches.

After earning their rank advancement, many Boy Scout Troops choose to pursue one or more of the High Adventure Awards for Boy Scouts.

Learn more about these awards on the WLACC High Adventure Team Website (leaves WLACC-council maintained website)

Cub Scout High Adventure Awards


Mowgli

The High Adventure Team administers a supplementary patch program for Cub Scouts.

There are rules and requirements to earning these cool patches.

After earning their rank advancement, many Cub Scout dens choose to pursue one or more of the High Adventure Awards for Cub Scouts.

Learn more about these awards on the WLACC High Adventure Team Website (leaves WLACC-council maintained website)

Cub Scouting


What is Cub Scouting?

13

Cub Scouting is a year-round family program designed for boys who are in the first grade through fifth grade (or 7, 8, 9, and 10 years of age).

The Purposes of Cub Scouting

Since 1930, the Boy Scouts of America has helped younger boys through Cub Scouting. It is a year-round family program designed for boys who are in the first grade through fifth grade (or 7, 8, 9, and 10 years of age). Parents, leaders, and organizations work together to achieve the purposes of Cub Scouting. Currently, Cub Scouting is the largest of the BSA’s three membership divisions. (The others are Boy Scouting and Venturing.)

The ten purposes of Cub Scouting are:

  • Character Development
  • Spiritual Growth
  • Good Citizenship
  • Sportsmanship and Fitness
  • Family Understanding
  • Respectful Relationships
  • Personal Achievement
  • Friendly Service
  • Fun and Adventure
  • Preparation for Boy Scouts

Membership

Cub Scouting members join a Cub Scout pack and are assigned to a den, usually a neighborhood group of six to eight boys. Tiger Cubs (first-graders), Wolf Cub Scouts (second-graders), Bear Cub Scouts (third-graders), and Webelos Scouts (fourth- and fifth-graders) meet weekly.

Once a month, all of the dens and family members gather for a pack meeting under the direction of a Cubmaster and pack committee. The committee includes parents of boys in the pack and members of the chartered organization.

Volunteer Leadership

Thousands of volunteer leaders, both men and women, are involved in the Cub Scout program. They serve in a variety of positions, as everything from unit leaders to pack committee chairmen, committee members, den leaders, and chartered organization representatives.

Like other phases of the Scouting program, a Cub Scout pack belongs to an organization with interests similar to those of the BSA. This organization, which might be a church, school, community organization, or group of interested citizens, is chartered by the local BSA council to use the Scouting program. This chartered organization provides a suitable meeting place, adult leadership, supervision, and opportunities for a healthy Scouting life for the boys under its care. Each organization appoints one of its members as a chartered organization representative. The organization, through the pack committee, is responsible for providing leadership, the meeting place, and support materials for pack activities.

Who Pays For It?

Groups responsible for supporting Cub Scouting are the boys and their parents, the pack, the chartered organization, and the community. The boy is encouraged to pay his own way by contributing dues each week. Packs also obtain income by working on approved money-earning projects. The community, including parents, supports Cub Scouting through the United Way, Friends of Scouting enrollment, bequests, and special contributions to the BSA local council. This financial support provides leadership training, outdoor programs, council service centers and other facilities, and professional service for units.

Advancement Plan

Recognition is important to young boys. The Cub Scouting advancement plan provides fun for the boys, gives them a sense of personal achievement as they earn badges, and strengthens family understanding as adult family members work with boys on advancement projects.

Tiger Cub. The Tiger Cub program is for first-grade (or age 7) boys and their adult partners. There are five Tiger Cub achievement areas. The Tiger Cub, working with his adult partner, completes 15 requirements within these areas to earn the Tiger Cub badge. These requirements consist of an exciting series of indoor and outdoor activities just right for a boy in the first grade.

Bobcat. The Bobcat rank is for all boys who join Cub Scouting.

Wolf. The Wolf program is for boys who have completed first grade (or are age 8). To earn the Wolf badge, a boy must pass 12 achievements involving simple physical and mental skills.

Bear. The Bear rank is for boys who have completed second grade (or are age 9). There are 24 Bear achievements in four categories. The Cub Scout must complete 12 of these to earn the Bear badge. These requirements are somewhat more difficult and challenging than those for Wolf rank.

Webelos. This program is for boys who have completed third grade (or are age 10). A boy may begin working on the Webelos badge as soon as he joins a Webelos den. This is the first step in his transition from the Webelos den to the Boy Scout troop. As he completes the requirements found in the Webelos Handbook, he will work on activity badges, attend meetings led by adults, and become familiar with the Boy Scout requirements—all leading to the Arrow of Light Award.

Activities

Cub Scouting means “doing.” Everything in Cub Scouting is designed to have the boys doing things. Activities are used to achieve the aims of Scouting—citizenship training, character development, and personal fitness.

Many of the activities happen right in the den and pack. The most important are the weekly den meetings and the monthly pack meetings.

Cub Scout Academics and Sports

The Cub Scout Academics and Sports program provides the opportunity for boys to learn new techniques, increase scholarship skills, develop sportsmanship, and have fun. Participation in the program allows boys to be recognized for physical fitness and talent-building activities.

Camping

Age-appropriate camping programs are packed with theme-oriented action that brings Tiger Cubs, Cub Scouts, and Webelos Scouts into the great out-of-doors. Day camping comes to the boy in his own area; resident camping is a four-day to weeklong experience in which Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts camp within a developed theme of adventure and excitement. Cub Scout pack families enjoy camping in local council camps and other council-approved campsites. Camping programs combine fun and excitement with doing one’s best, getting along with others, and developing an appreciation for ecology and the world of the outdoors.

Publications

Volunteers are informed of national news and events through Scouting magazine (circulation 900,000). Boys may subscribe to Boys’ Life magazine (circulation 1.3 million). Both are published by the Boy Scouts of America. Also available are a number of youth and leader publications, including the Tiger Cub Handbook, Wolf Handbook, Bear Handbook, Webelos Handbook, Cub Scout Leader Book, Cub Scout Program Helps, and Webelos Leader Guide.

Cub Scouting Ideals

Apart from the fun and excitement of Cub Scout activities, the Cub Scout Promise, the Law of the Pack, the Tiger Cub motto, and the Cub Scout sign, handshake, motto, and salute all teach good citizenship and contribute to a boy’s sense of belonging.

Cub Scout Promise

I, (name), promise to do my best To do my duty to God and my country, To help other people, and To obey the Law of the Pack.

Cub Scout Motto

Do Your Best.

Tiger Cub Motto

Search, Discover, Share.

Law of the Pack

The Cub Scout follows Akela. The Cub Scout helps the pack go. The pack helps the Cub Scout grow. The Cub Scout gives goodwill.

Colors

The Cub Scout colors are blue and gold. They have special meaning, which will help boys see beyond the fun of Cub Scouting to its ultimate goals.

The blue stands for truth and spirituality, steadfast loyalty, and the sky above. The gold stands for warm sunlight, good cheer, and happiness.

Cahuenga District Roundtables


Cahuenga District Roundtable Information:

  • Second Thursday Every Month!
  • 7:00 PM
  • First United Methodist Church, Social Hall, 4832 Tujunga Avenue, North Hollywood, CA 91601
  • Fellowship
  • Council and District Announcements
  • Training, Program materials, ideas and help.
  • Camaraderie among adult leaders and parents with the goal of bringing the best of the Scouting Program to our Cub Packs, Boy Scout Troops, Venturing Crews, Sea Scout Ships, etc.
  • If you want your child to have the best Scouting experience, you need to attend our Roundtable.
  • Come in uniform if you have one; come anyway if you don’t.