World Jamboree


The Boy Scout World Jamboree is held every four years in a different country around the world. It happens on a different 4-year cycle from the National Jamboree, so a Scout can attend the National Jamboree one year and the World Jamboree in a different year. Because of the age restrictions, most Scouts only get one opportunity to attend this unbelievable event as a Boy Scout. So if you are interested, don’t put this off!!

World Jamboree Websites

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The World Scout Jamboree is the largest camping event organized by the World Organization of
the Scout Movement (WOSM), gathering as many as 50,000 Scouts and leaders from 169
National Scout Organizations. The 24th World Scout Jamboree (WSJ) is co-hosted by Scouts
Canada, Association de Scouts de Mexico, and the Boy Scouts of America. The last time the
United States hosted a WSJ was in 1967 in Idaho.

The WSJ is an educational event bringing together young men and young women from around
the world to promote peace, mutual understanding, and to develop leadership skills. The
Jamboree will feature the hallmarks of past World Jamboree programs, such as the Global
Development Village, the World Scout Centre, a special sustainability initiative, and the
socialization elements that allow participants to make lifelong friends from around the world.
Participation is open to eligible men and women who are registered members in the Boy Scouts
of America. World Scout Jamboree units will be organized on a regional (not Council) basis.
The theme for the 24th World Scout Jamboree is “Unlock a New World”. This reflects the new
adventures, cultures and friendships that will be shared by Scouts from around the world. We
hope you can join us!

The United States Contingent is limited on the number of people that we can send to a World
Scout Jamboree. While we will be able to send more to this Jamboree than ever before, we
expect there to be tremendous interest and encourage folks to apply as soon as possible.

When is it

July 22 – August 2, 2019 (USA Contingent will arrive on July 21, 2019)

Where is it

Summit Bechtel Scout Reserve
West Virginia, USA

Who can go

Birthday between July 22, 2001 and July 21, 2005
– Youth participants (boys and girls) must be age 14-17

Birthday before July 22, 2001 (age 18 and older)
– Adult unit leaders (age 18 and older)
– International Service Team (IST) age 18 and older

How to go

Participants, adult leaders, and IST will complete an online application. Applications will be reviewed on
both a Council and National level. Official information and a link to the online application can be found on
the USA Contingent website: https://wsj2019.us/apply

 

See the Western Region flyer here

See the full WSJ welcome letter here

Dear Scouter,

First, let me say how sorry we all are here at WLACC for the speech made by our President. If the President would have delivered his prepared speech things would have been much better. Unfortunately, he went off script and the results were inappropriate for the setting.

Our Facebook and other social media sites were overrun with comments. Many were from people who were unhappy with the speech and the behavior of some of the Scouts. Some however went beyond the pale.

My phone blew up starting at 5:45 am with a call from Massachusetts and ending at 8:07 pm with a call from Burbank. In between there were sixty-seven calls, again most were people unhappy about the Scouts “allowing” President Trump to speak and for our Scouts booing President Obama. Many had similar talking points and many referred to the Boy Scouts as the Hitler Youth. I called every one of the folks back as I always do. Most ended with a very positive result and people felt better about the Boy Scouts, but a couple of people were just over the top. One person just screamed “Sieg Heil” and called me a Storm Trooper. Some others tried to turn this around and “bash” President Obama for not appearing and how it’s great for the Scouts to hear from a President who cares. Neither would engage in a meaningful conversation, which is why I am writing this letter.

For over thirty-five years I have worked for the Boy Scouts. I have served coast to coast with the majority of my career spent in the Midwest. I have always worked hard to make sure that the BSA embraces change, sometimes at a personal cost. I have always felt that change occurs when civil conversations are had. Leadership involves listening, rational thinking and consensus building, all of which we teach our youth leaders. I have been in the minority on a large number of issues from selling popcorn, women in Scouting, Cub Scout camping, gay youth and leaders and transgender youth/adult participation. The first three are just accepted now as business as usual and the others are moving in that direction. This does not happen without a willingness to share thoughts and ideas and a willingness to compromise with others.

The Boy Scouts is not a white Christian organization. It involves people of all races, ethnic backgrounds, religions and income levels. It is made up of red, blue and purple states.

Sadly, our country is in the midst of a crisis. We no longer seem capable of a civil conversation; we no longer work together or compromise to achieve the best results for the majority of people. Calling the Boy Scouts a Hitler Youth group is totally unacceptable. My daughter is Jewish, as is our Council President. Synagogues are a strong charter partner for us both locally and nationally. The Boy Scouts teach young people “to help other people at all times”, and that service beyond self is critical. The Boy Scouts lifts people up; the Hitler Youth and Pioneers (Stalin’s Program) push people down. We teach young men and women to be leaders and to work together to achieve goals and objectives. We teach them to listen, to respect others and to work as a team. But outside the Boy Scouts we have a society that wants us to choose sides that refuses to see the value in the other guys opinion and name call those we disagree with. The Boys Scouts needs everybody’s help to make sure our next generation of leaders gets back to a civil discourse and “stop” this divisive culture. It’s time for real leaders to lead and leave the name calling and blame game to others.

Please do not let others tell you what to think. If you believe the Boy Scouts of America is an important part of our future please help us strengthen our programs. If you believe that America still is the shining beacon of hope in our world, let’s all work to make it a reality. I believe in our future. I believe that the vast majority of people want a better country and a better world for our children. It’s time to get to work to make it happen for all our youth.

Here are a few excerpts from President Trump’s speech.

“The United States has no better citizens than the Boy Scouts. The values, the traditions and the skills you learn here will serve you throughout your lives, and just as importantly they will serve your families, your cities, and in the future, will serve your country. The Scouts believe in putting America first.
When natural disaster strikes, when people face hardships, when the beauty and glory of our natural spaces need to be restored and taken care of, America turns to the Boy Scouts because we know that the Boy Scouts will never ever let us down”.

This was a positive message that is now lost in time. What a difference it could have made. Please check out our Facebook pages for other links on this subject.

Thank you for all you are doing for the young people here in the Western Los Angeles County Council. See you on the trail

Matthew Thornton
Scout Executive
Boy Scouts of America
Western Los Angeles County Council

National Jamboree


The Boy Scout National Jamboree is held every four years. Because of the age restrictions, most Scouts only get one opportunity to attend this unbelievable event as a Boy Scout. So if you are interested, don’t put this off!! What is a Jamboree?

In 1916, Sir Robert Baden-Powell, founder of the Scouting movement, knew what success looked like for the 10th anniversary of Scouting. It was the sight of thousands of youth gathered together to celebrate. The jamboree was born! In his words, “The secret of its growth lies in that indeterminate force which we only know as the ‘Scout Spirit,’ and grow it has!” Since 1937, more than 654,000 Scouts and leaders have shared the jamboree experience and hiked the trails, paths, and roadways at previous national Scout jamborees. Now, it’s your turn to celebrate! It is the opportunity of a lifetime, one you will never forget. DON’T MISS OUT on this special moment in time! A jamboree is truly a Scouts mountain-top experience.

Tour and Travel Plans

Troop “A”—The “Behind the Scenes of America – The GO BIG GET WILD TOUR”

Departs Los Angeles July 8th, 2013.

This exciting tour focuses on visiting behind the scenes of manufacturing, research, entertainment, government, military, educational and other select locations not normally accessible to the public. We will be touring amazing and historic places in the Philadelphia area, Washington, D.C., Orlando, Florida, Cape Canaveral, Florida and the Bahamas. A few highlights include touring the US. Mint, Independence Hall, Hershey’s Chocolate World & Theme Park, Smithsonian Museums, Ford’s Theater, White House, Ft. McHenry, Baltimore Orioles Game, Monticello, US Naval Academy, Harley Davidson Motorcycle Factory and more. This once and a lifetime tour will also visit the Islands of Adventure Amusement Park (Hogwart’s Castle & Village and Harry Potter Adventure Ride), The Animal Kingdom Park (behind the scenes), Gatorland and includes a tour of the Kennedy Space Center (with special lunch with an astronaut) plus a cruise to the Bahamas to BSA reef snorkel and more!!! Parents and families may join in on the fun and attend the portion of this troop’s tour beginning on July 24th, 2013 in Florida and the Bahamas, for a separate price to be determined. Troop A returns to Los Angeles on July 31st, 2013.

Cost $5,995.00 (app. $375 per month)

Troop “B”—The “Passport Required Tour”

Departs July 5th, 2013 with visits to the CN Tower, Royal Ontario Museum, Casa Loma Castle, Niagara Falls, the Baseball Hall of Fame, key sites in New York (Nintendo World, 9/11 Memorial, and a Broadway show), Philadelphia, Lancaster to check out the Amish way of life, Hershey (Founders Hall, Hershey’s Chocolate World), and Gettysburg Visitor Center and Museum. Then off to the 2013 Jamboree at the Summit Bechtel Scout Reserve, West Virginia. After the Jamboree we will check out the Hazy Center and then catch an afternoon flight home.

Cost $5,830(app. $360 per month)

Venturing Crew “E”—The “Ad—Venture Tour”

Departs July 5, 2013 to Philadelphia, PA. We’ll take the historical Spirit of ‘76 Ghost Tour, explore the Constitution Tour on a cool Segway, visit Amish Country in Lancaster, and participate in 150th Anniversary Gettysburg re– enactment. Then on to New York City to sail aboard the Clipper City, 158 foot schooner in the Manhattan Bay, visit the Empire State Building, Central Park Bike Tour, 911 Memorial, Times Square, and a Broadway show! Next, we’ll visit The Smithsonian, Washington Monument, Lincoln Memorial, and the Mall in Washington DC. Then meet with a Congressman and a private tour of the Capital. Then explore the Potomac river around Washington, DC on a kayak. Take a trip through time to Colonial Williamsburg with a day of fun at Bush Gardens. Get on board The Batteau, the re-enactment of Tom Sawyer’s overnight boat tour to a private island in Lynchburg, VA. Finally, we’ll have 10 exciting days at the Jamboree where the Venturers will get to repel, scuba dive, rock climb, white water raft, and many more fun activities. After the Jamboree we’ll visit Winston-Salem and Raleigh, NC before we return home on July 25th, 2013.

Cost $4,788(app. $285 per month)

Youth Protection Training (Effective 9/1/17)
Effective September 1, 2017, Youth Protection Training will be required for all adult leaders at the time of registration. Paper applications from new leaders must be accompanied by a Youth Protection Training completion certificate, which must be filed with the application.
Because completion of YPT is now required for all leaders at the time of registration, unit leaders must obtain copies of the completion certificates from the leaders who register online before approving their application.
With the upcoming renewal cycle, the Internet Rechartering system will be updated so that units cannot submit the registration renewal of any adult who does not have current YPT as of the effective date of the renewal. Completion of YPT as part of the online registration system will be required in a future update. Additionally, council registrars will no longer be able to override the registration system to register any leader whose Youth Protection Training is not current.
Effective for the 2018 BSA summer camp season, any adult accompanying a Boy Scout troop to a residence camp or other Scouting activity lasting 72 hours or more must be registered as a leader, including completion of a CBC and YPT, even if they are the parent of a youth on the trip.
Please Note: Although YPT is strongly encouraged for adults attending any overnight activity, at this time, the requirement applies only to individual adults staying three or more nights at a resident camp.

Membership Fee Increase (Effective 12/1/17)
The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Scout Law.
To do this — while delivering the nation’s foremost youth development program — the BSA must remain vigilant in controlling costs. Although we have been successful in reducing our expenditures in many areas, it has become necessary to evaluate our annual membership fees.
Based on feedback from both volunteers and employees, the BSA membership fee will increase to $33 for all registered youth and adult leaders, effective December 1, 2017.
Membership fees support the services that are necessary to provide Scouting to youth from 7 to 21 years of age. From education to high-adventure experiences you can’t get anyplace else, the BSA provides unique growth opportunities at a great value.
Services include primary liability coverage for all volunteer leaders and chartered organizations, ongoing advances in technology, fundraising support, new program development and membership recruiting strategies, and support materials. In 2016 alone, the BSA served 2.3 million youth members through approximately 270 local councils across the United States and its territories.
With the help of all of our volunteers and Scouting parents, we will continue accomplishing incredible things for young people and the communities we serve. Please see the attached “2017 Membership Fee Increase FINAL.docx” for more information, including a Q&A section.

2017 Membership Fee Increase  Q&A

The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

To do this — while delivering the nation’s foremost youth development program — the BSA must remain vigilant in controlling costs. Although we have been successful in reducing our expenditures in many areas, it has become necessary to evaluate our annual membership fees.

Based on feedback from both volunteers and employees, the BSA membership fee will increase to $33 for all registered youth and adult leaders, effective December 1, 2017.
Membership fees support the services that are necessary to provide Scouting to youth from 7 to 21 years of age. From education to high-adventure experiences you can’t get anyplace else, the BSA provides unique growth opportunities at a great value.

Services include primary liability coverage for all volunteer leaders and chartered organizations, ongoing advances in technology, fundraising support, new program development and membership recruiting strategies, and support materials. In 2016 alone, the BSA served 2.3 million youth members through approximately 270 local councils across the United States and its territories.

With the help of all of our volunteers and Scouting parents, we will continue accomplishing incredible things for young people and the communities we serve.

Questions and Answers:

1. Why are you increasing the membership fee? What is the additional money from the fees going to be used for?

To deliver the Scouting program to our 2.3 million youth members, it is occasionally necessary for the organization to increase membership fees to offset rising costs. As a result, the BSA is increasing our membership fee to $33 for all registered Scouts and adult members effective December 1, 2017.

Membership fees support the services that are necessary to provide Scouting programs to a growing number of youth. Services include ongoing advances in technology, council visits to assist in fundraising, program development and membership campaigns, liability insurance costs, and administrative costs. It is important that we continue to maintain a strong financial position in the future to support and grow Scouting.

2. What is directly contributing to the need for this increase?

There are a variety of factors taken into consideration, all of which have led to an increased cost of doing business.

3. When will the increase go into effect?

The membership fee change for all registered youth and adult leaders will go into effect December 1, 2017. This change will affect Cub Scout packs, Boy Scout troops, Venturing crews, Sea Scout ships, and Exploring posts/clubs. However, it will NOT apply to LDS-sponsored units, nor to those units with council-paid memberships. Note: All November and December 2017 recharters will have to renew at this new rate (since November recharter renewal actually spans from December 1, 2017, to November 30, 2018).

4. Does the BSA increase membership fees often?

There have been 10 fee increases in the organization’s history. Since 1969, the BSA has increased our fee, on average, every five years. The last membership increase took effect on January 1, 2014, and, prior to that, in 2010.

5. How much does it cost to be a Boy Scout?

All youth and adults who wish to become a member or leader of the Boy Scouts of America must pay the annual membership fee. Beyond that, families incur additional costs related to uniforms and the activities of their individual units.

6. Will the fee for Cub Scouts, Exploring, and Venturing/Sea Scouts increase as well?

Yes. This change will affect Cub Scout packs, Boy Scout troops, Venturing crews, Sea Scout ships, and Exploring posts/clubs. However, it will NOT apply to LDS-sponsored units, nor to those units with council-paid memberships.

7. Who gets the membership fee?

Local councils collect — and forward to the National Council — membership fees from each youth and adult who wishes to become a member of the Boy Scouts of America.

8. How is the National Council funded?

The National Council is funded through membership and service fees, investments, Boys’ Life magazine subscriptions, sales of uniforms and equipment, fees from national high-adventure bases, and contributions from individuals.

9. What does the National Council do for Scouting on the local level?

The BSA’s National Council provides program materials and support for approximately 270 local councils that administer the Scouting program, with each covering a specific geographic territory. The following are the key functions of the National Council:

 Provide training to local council volunteers and staff
 Maintain a national training center at Philmont Scout Ranch
 Develop and maintain four year-round national high-adventure bases and execute national events (jamborees, National Eagle Scout Association and Order of the Arrow conferences, and National Council meetings)
 Continue our leadership role in protecting our youth by providing youth protection resources, training, and criminal background checks for all registered volunteers and staff
 Provide local councils with program as well as tools for camp and office planning and evaluation, extensive financial counseling, planned giving and fundraising information, and professional personnel support
 Coordinate a communications network through magazines and literature (handbooks, merit badge pamphlets, brochures, training materials, and professional development training), including providing Scouting magazine to all registered leaders
 Make available uniforms, equipment, and program supplies
 Maintain and develop new relationships with chartered organizations that use the Scouting program (religious institutions, civic organizations, labor unions, professional organizations, business, and industry)
 Serve in a leadership role with Scouting associations in other countries as a member of the World Scout Conference
 Set and maintain program standards (e.g., advancement, health and safety, etc.) to ensure consistency of the brand throughout councils across the country

10. With the increase in membership fees, is Scouting still a good value?

The BSA has always taken into consideration the cost of delivering the Scouting program and has worked to keep our fees reasonable.

When you compare the BSA to other youth-serving organizations, we provide unique growth opportunities at a great value. The following are costs associated with other youth activities:

 Tackle football, $142: In Plano, Texas, second- through sixth-graders who play tackle football pay $140 for a three-month season. That fee doesn’t include equipment.
 Youth orchestra, $1,000: Members of the prestigious Los Angeles Youth Orchestra pay $100 to audition, $1,000 annually (if accepted), and must buy their own instruments.
 Select soccer, $400: In Cleveland, select youth soccer players ages 15 to 18 pay $400 a season, plus $180 for uniforms.
 Youth basketball, $525: In Queens, N.Y., boys ages 8 to 13 pay $525 a year, not including uniforms.
 4-H program, $25: Participants of the 4-H program in College Station, Texas, pay $25 a year, not including fees for individual activities.

From education to high-adventure, the Boy Scouts of America provides unique growth opportunities at a great value and we want all eligible youth to receive these benefits and participate in Scouting.

Youth Protection Training (Effective 9/1/17)
Effective September 1, 2017, Youth Protection Training will be required for all adult leaders at the time of registration. Paper applications from new leaders must be accompanied by a Youth Protection Training completion certificate, which must be filed with the application.
Because completion of YPT is now required for all leaders at the time of registration, unit leaders must obtain copies of the completion certificates from the leaders who register online before approving their application.
With the upcoming renewal cycle, the Internet Rechartering system will be updated so that units cannot submit the registration renewal of any adult who does not have current YPT as of the effective date of the renewal. Completion of YPT as part of the online registration system will be required in a future update. Additionally, council registrars will no longer be able to override the registration system to register any leader whose Youth Protection Training is not current.
Effective for the 2018 BSA summer camp season, any adult accompanying a Boy Scout troop to a residence camp or other Scouting activity lasting 72 hours or more must be registered as a leader, including completion of a CBC and YPT, even if they are the parent of a youth on the trip.
Please Note: Although YPT is strongly encouraged for adults attending any overnight activity, at this time, the requirement applies only to individual adults staying three or more nights at a resident camp.

Membership Fee Increase (Effective 12/1/17)
The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Scout Law.
To do this — while delivering the nation’s foremost youth development program — the BSA must remain vigilant in controlling costs. Although we have been successful in reducing our expenditures in many areas, it has become necessary to evaluate our annual membership fees.
Based on feedback from both volunteers and employees, the BSA membership fee will increase to $33 for all registered youth and adult leaders, effective December 1, 2017.
Membership fees support the services that are necessary to provide Scouting to youth from 7 to 21 years of age. From education to high-adventure experiences you can’t get anyplace else, the BSA provides unique growth opportunities at a great value.
Services include primary liability coverage for all volunteer leaders and chartered organizations, ongoing advances in technology, fundraising support, new program development and membership recruiting strategies, and support materials. In 2016 alone, the BSA served 2.3 million youth members through approximately 270 local councils across the United States and its territories.
With the help of all of our volunteers and Scouting parents, we will continue accomplishing incredible things for young people and the communities we serve. Please see the attached “2017 Membership Fee Increase FINAL.docx” for more information, including a Q&A section.

2017 Membership Fee Increase  Q&A

The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

To do this — while delivering the nation’s foremost youth development program — the BSA must remain vigilant in controlling costs. Although we have been successful in reducing our expenditures in many areas, it has become necessary to evaluate our annual membership fees.

Based on feedback from both volunteers and employees, the BSA membership fee will increase to $33 for all registered youth and adult leaders, effective December 1, 2017.
Membership fees support the services that are necessary to provide Scouting to youth from 7 to 21 years of age. From education to high-adventure experiences you can’t get anyplace else, the BSA provides unique growth opportunities at a great value.

Services include primary liability coverage for all volunteer leaders and chartered organizations, ongoing advances in technology, fundraising support, new program development and membership recruiting strategies, and support materials. In 2016 alone, the BSA served 2.3 million youth members through approximately 270 local councils across the United States and its territories.

With the help of all of our volunteers and Scouting parents, we will continue accomplishing incredible things for young people and the communities we serve.

Questions and Answers:

1. Why are you increasing the membership fee? What is the additional money from the fees going to be used for?

To deliver the Scouting program to our 2.3 million youth members, it is occasionally necessary for the organization to increase membership fees to offset rising costs. As a result, the BSA is increasing our membership fee to $33 for all registered Scouts and adult members effective December 1, 2017.

Membership fees support the services that are necessary to provide Scouting programs to a growing number of youth. Services include ongoing advances in technology, council visits to assist in fundraising, program development and membership campaigns, liability insurance costs, and administrative costs. It is important that we continue to maintain a strong financial position in the future to support and grow Scouting.

2. What is directly contributing to the need for this increase?

There are a variety of factors taken into consideration, all of which have led to an increased cost of doing business.

3. When will the increase go into effect?

The membership fee change for all registered youth and adult leaders will go into effect December 1, 2017. This change will affect Cub Scout packs, Boy Scout troops, Venturing crews, Sea Scout ships.  Exploring posts/clubs fee is $24 until Aug 1, 2018 when it will change to $33. However, it will NOT apply to LDS-sponsored units, nor to those units with council-paid memberships. Note: All November and December 2017 recharters will have to renew at this new rate (since November recharter renewal actually spans from December 1, 2017, to November 30, 2018).

4. Does the BSA increase membership fees often?

There have been 10 fee increases in the organization’s history. Since 1969, the BSA has increased our fee, on average, every five years. The last membership increase took effect on January 1, 2014, and, prior to that, in 2010.

5. How much does it cost to be a Boy Scout?

All youth and adults who wish to become a member or leader of the Boy Scouts of America must pay the annual membership fee. Beyond that, families incur additional costs related to uniforms and the activities of their individual units.

6. Will the fee for Cub Scouts, Exploring, and Venturing/Sea Scouts increase as well?

Yes. This change will affect Cub Scout packs, Boy Scout troops, Venturing crews, Sea Scout ships, and Exploring posts/clubs. However, it will NOT apply to LDS-sponsored units, nor to those units with council-paid memberships. *Exploring Post & Clubs fees will be $24 until August 1, 2018 when they will change to $33.

7. Who gets the membership fee?

Local councils collect — and forward to the National Council — membership fees from each youth and adult who wishes to become a member of the Boy Scouts of America.

8. How is the National Council funded?

The National Council is funded through membership and service fees, investments, Boys’ Life magazine subscriptions, sales of uniforms and equipment, fees from national high-adventure bases, and contributions from individuals.

9. What does the National Council do for Scouting on the local level?

The BSA’s National Council provides program materials and support for approximately 270 local councils that administer the Scouting program, with each covering a specific geographic territory. The following are the key functions of the National Council:

 Provide training to local council volunteers and staff
 Maintain a national training center at Philmont Scout Ranch
 Develop and maintain four year-round national high-adventure bases and execute national events (jamborees, National Eagle Scout Association and Order of the Arrow conferences, and National Council meetings)
 Continue our leadership role in protecting our youth by providing youth protection resources, training, and criminal background checks for all registered volunteers and staff
 Provide local councils with program as well as tools for camp and office planning and evaluation, extensive financial counseling, planned giving and fundraising information, and professional personnel support
 Coordinate a communications network through magazines and literature (handbooks, merit badge pamphlets, brochures, training materials, and professional development training), including providing Scouting magazine to all registered leaders
 Make available uniforms, equipment, and program supplies
 Maintain and develop new relationships with chartered organizations that use the Scouting program (religious institutions, civic organizations, labor unions, professional organizations, business, and industry)
 Serve in a leadership role with Scouting associations in other countries as a member of the World Scout Conference
 Set and maintain program standards (e.g., advancement, health and safety, etc.) to ensure consistency of the brand throughout councils across the country

10. With the increase in membership fees, is Scouting still a good value?

The BSA has always taken into consideration the cost of delivering the Scouting program and has worked to keep our fees reasonable.

When you compare the BSA to other youth-serving organizations, we provide unique growth opportunities at a great value. The following are costs associated with other youth activities:

 Tackle football, $142: In Plano, Texas, second- through sixth-graders who play tackle football pay $140 for a three-month season. That fee doesn’t include equipment.
 Youth orchestra, $1,000: Members of the prestigious Los Angeles Youth Orchestra pay $100 to audition, $1,000 annually (if accepted), and must buy their own instruments.
 Select soccer, $400: In Cleveland, select youth soccer players ages 15 to 18 pay $400 a season, plus $180 for uniforms.
 Youth basketball, $525: In Queens, N.Y., boys ages 8 to 13 pay $525 a year, not including uniforms.
 4-H program, $25: Participants of the 4-H program in College Station, Texas, pay $25 a year, not including fees for individual activities.

From education to high-adventure, the Boy Scouts of America provides unique growth opportunities at a great value and we want all eligible youth to receive these benefits and participate in Scouting.

Boy Scouting


11

Purpose of the BSA

The Boy Scouts of America was incorporated to provide a program for community organizations that offers effective character, citizenship, and personal fitness training for youth.

Specifically, the BSA endeavors to develop American citizens who are physically, mentally, and emotionally fit; have a high degree of self-reliance as evidenced in such qualities as initiative, courage, and resourcefulness; have personal values based on religious concepts; have the desire and skills to help others; understand the principles of the American social, economic, and governmental systems; are knowledgeable about and take pride in their American heritage and understand our nation’s role in the world; have a keen respect for the basic rights of all people; and are prepared to participate in and give leadership to American society.
Volunteer Scouters

Thousands of volunteer leaders, both men and women, are involved in the Boy Scouting program. They serve in a variety of jobs—everything from unit leaders to chairmen of troop committees, committee members, merit badge counselors, and chartered organization representatives.

Like other phases of the program, Boy Scouting is made available to community organizations having similar interests and goals. Chartered organizations include professional organizations; governmental bodies; and religious, educational, civic, fraternal, business, labor, and citizens’ groups. Each organization appoints one of its members as the chartered organization representative. The organization is responsible for leadership, the meeting place, and support for troop activities.

Who Pays for It?

Several groups are responsible for supporting Boy Scouting: the boy and his parents, the troop, the chartered organization, and the community. Boys are encouraged to earn money whenever possible to pay their own expenses, and they also contribute dues to their troop treasuries to pay for budgeted items. Troops obtain additional income by working on approved money-earning projects. The community, including parents, supports Scouting through the United Way, Friends of Scouting campaigns, bequests, and special contributions to the BSA local council. This income provides leadership training, outdoor programs, council service centers and other facilities, and professional service for units.
Aims and Methods of the Scouting Program

The Scouting program has three specific objectives, commonly referred to as the “Aims of Scouting.” They are character development, citizenship training, and personal fitness.

The methods by which the aims are achieved are listed below in random order to emphasize the equal importance of each.

Ideals

The ideals of Boy Scouting are spelled out in the Scout Oath, the Scout Law, the Scout motto, and the Scout slogan. The Boy Scout measures himself against these ideals and continually tries to improve. The goals are high, and as he reaches for them, he has some control over what and who he becomes.

Patrols

The patrol method gives Boy Scouts an experience in group living and participating citizenship. It places responsibility on young shoulders and teaches boys how to accept it. The patrol method allows Scouts to interact in small groups where members can easily relate to each other. These small groups determine troop activities through elected representatives.

Outdoor Programs

Boy Scouting is designed to take place outdoors. It is in the outdoor setting that Scouts share responsibilities and learn to live with one another. In the outdoors the skills and activities practiced at troop meetings come alive with purpose. Being close to nature helps Boy Scouts gain an appreciation for the beauty of the world around us. The outdoors is the laboratory in which Boy Scouts learn ecology and practice conservation of nature’s resources.

Advancement

Boy Scouting provides a series of surmountable obstacles and steps in overcoming them through the advancement method. The Boy Scout plans his advancement and progresses at his own pace as he meets each challenge. The Boy Scout is rewarded for each achievement, which helps him gain self-confidence. The steps in the advancement system help a Boy Scout grow in self-reliance and in the ability to help others.

Associations With Adults

Boys learn a great deal by watching how adults conduct themselves. Scout leaders can be positive role models for the members of the troop. In many cases a Scoutmaster who is willing to listen to boys, encourage them, and take a sincere interest in them can make a profound difference in their lives.

Personal Growth

As Boy Scouts plan their activities and progress toward their goals, they experience personal growth. The Good Turn concept is a major part of the personal growth method of Boy Scouting. Boys grow as they participate in community service projects and do Good Turns for others. Probably no device is as successful in developing a basis for personal growth as the daily Good Turn. The religious emblems program also is a large part of the personal growth method. Frequent personal conferences with his Scoutmaster help each Boy Scout to determine his growth toward Scouting’s aims.

Leadership Development

The Boy Scout program encourages boys to learn and practice leadership skills. Every Boy Scout has the opportunity to participate in both shared and total leadership situations. Understanding the concepts of leadership helps a boy accept the leadership role of others and guides him toward the citizenship aim of Scouting.

Uniform

The uniform makes the Boy Scout troop visible as a force for good and creates a positive youth image in the community. Boy Scouting is an action program, and wearing the uniform is an action that shows each Boy Scout’s commitment to the aims and purposes of Scouting. The uniform gives the Boy Scout identity in a world brotherhood of youth who believe in the same ideals. The uniform is practical attire for Boy Scout activities and provides a way for Boy Scouts to wear the badges that show what they have accomplished.

Outdoor Activities

Our council operates and maintains four Scout camps,

The BSA conducts a national Scout jamboree every four years and participates in world Scout jamborees (also held at four-year intervals). Fort A. P. Hill, Virginia, was the site of the 2001 National Scout Jamboree.

The Beginning of Scouting

Scouting, as known to millions of youth and adults, evolved during the early 1900s through the efforts of several men dedicated to bettering youth. These pioneers of the program conceived outdoor activities that developed skills in young boys and gave them a sense of enjoyment, fellowship, and a code of conduct for everyday living.

In this country and abroad at the turn of the century, it was thought that children needed certain kinds of education that the schools couldn’t or didn’t provide. This led to the formation of a variety of youth groups, many with the word “Scout” in their names. For example, Ernest Thompson Seton, an American naturalist, artist, writer, and lecturer, originated a group called the Woodcraft Indians and in 1902 wrote a guidebook for boys in his organization called the Birch Bark Roll. Meanwhile in Britain, Robert Baden-Powell, after returning to his country a hero following military service in Africa, found boys reading the manual he had written for his regiment on stalking and survival in the wild. Gathering ideas from Seton, America’s Daniel Carter Beard, and other Scoutcraft experts, Baden-Powell rewrote his manual as a nonmilitary skill book, which he titled Scouting for Boys. The book rapidly gained a wide readership in England and soon became popular in the United States. In 1907, when Baden-Powell held the first campout for Scouts on Brownsea Island off the coast of England, troops were spontaneously springing up in America.

William D. Boyce, a Chicago publisher, incorporated the Boy Scouts of America in 1910 after meeting with Baden-Powell. (Boyce was inspired to meet with the British founder by an unknown Scout who led him out of a dense London fog and refused to take a tip for doing a Good Turn.) Immediately after its incorporation, the BSA was assisted by officers of the YMCA in organizing a task force to help community organizations start and maintain a high-quality Scouting program. Those efforts climaxed in the organization of the nation’s first Scout camp at Lake George, New York, directed by Ernest Thompson Seton. Beard, who had established another youth group, the Sons of Daniel Boone (which he later merged with the BSA), provided assistance. Also on hand for this historic event was James E. West, a lawyer and an advocate of children’s rights, who later would become the first professional Chief Scout Executive of the Boy Scouts of America. Seton became the first volunteer national Chief Scout, and Beard, the first national Scout commissioner.

Publications

The BSA publishes the Boy Scout Handbook (more than 37.8 million copies of which have been printed); the Patrol Leader Handbook, which offers information relevant to boy leadership; the Scoutmaster Handbook; more than 100 merit badge pamphlets dealing with hobbies, vocations, and advanced Scoutcraft; and program features and various kinds of training, administrative, and organizational manuals for adult volunteer leaders and Boy Scouts. In addition, the BSA publishes Boys’ Life magazine, the national magazine for all boys (magazine circulation is more than 1.3 million) and Scouting magazine for volunteers, which has a circulation of over 1.1 million.

Conservation

Conservation activities supplement the program of Boy Scout advancement, summer camp, and outdoor activities and teach young people to better understand their interdependence with the environment.

Scout Law

TRUSTWORTHY
A Scout tells the truth. He keeps his promises. Honesty is part of his code of conduct. People can depend on him.

LOYAL
A Scout is true to his family, Scout leaders, friends, school, and nation.

HELPFUL
A Scout is concerned about other people. He does things willingly for others without pay or reward.

FRIENDLY
A Scout is a friend to all. He is a brother to other Scouts. He seeks to understand others. He respects those with ideas and customs other than his own.

COURTEOUS
A Scout is polite to everyone regardless of age or position. He knows good manners make it easier for people to get along together