Cub Scouting


What is Cub Scouting?

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Cub Scouting is a year-round family program designed for boys who are in the first grade through fifth grade (or 7, 8, 9, and 10 years of age).

The Purposes of Cub Scouting

Since 1930, the Boy Scouts of America has helped younger boys through Cub Scouting. It is a year-round family program designed for boys who are in the first grade through fifth grade (or 7, 8, 9, and 10 years of age). Parents, leaders, and organizations work together to achieve the purposes of Cub Scouting. Currently, Cub Scouting is the largest of the BSA’s three membership divisions. (The others are Boy Scouting and Venturing.)

The ten purposes of Cub Scouting are:

  • Character Development
  • Spiritual Growth
  • Good Citizenship
  • Sportsmanship and Fitness
  • Family Understanding
  • Respectful Relationships
  • Personal Achievement
  • Friendly Service
  • Fun and Adventure
  • Preparation for Boy Scouts

Membership

Cub Scouting members join a Cub Scout pack and are assigned to a den, usually a neighborhood group of six to eight boys. Tiger Cubs (first-graders), Wolf Cub Scouts (second-graders), Bear Cub Scouts (third-graders), and Webelos Scouts (fourth- and fifth-graders) meet weekly.

Once a month, all of the dens and family members gather for a pack meeting under the direction of a Cubmaster and pack committee. The committee includes parents of boys in the pack and members of the chartered organization.

Volunteer Leadership

Thousands of volunteer leaders, both men and women, are involved in the Cub Scout program. They serve in a variety of positions, as everything from unit leaders to pack committee chairmen, committee members, den leaders, and chartered organization representatives.

Like other phases of the Scouting program, a Cub Scout pack belongs to an organization with interests similar to those of the BSA. This organization, which might be a church, school, community organization, or group of interested citizens, is chartered by the local BSA council to use the Scouting program. This chartered organization provides a suitable meeting place, adult leadership, supervision, and opportunities for a healthy Scouting life for the boys under its care. Each organization appoints one of its members as a chartered organization representative. The organization, through the pack committee, is responsible for providing leadership, the meeting place, and support materials for pack activities.

Who Pays For It?

Groups responsible for supporting Cub Scouting are the boys and their parents, the pack, the chartered organization, and the community. The boy is encouraged to pay his own way by contributing dues each week. Packs also obtain income by working on approved money-earning projects. The community, including parents, supports Cub Scouting through the United Way, Friends of Scouting enrollment, bequests, and special contributions to the BSA local council. This financial support provides leadership training, outdoor programs, council service centers and other facilities, and professional service for units.

Advancement Plan

Recognition is important to young boys. The Cub Scouting advancement plan provides fun for the boys, gives them a sense of personal achievement as they earn badges, and strengthens family understanding as adult family members work with boys on advancement projects.

Tiger Cub. The Tiger Cub program is for first-grade (or age 7) boys and their adult partners. There are five Tiger Cub achievement areas. The Tiger Cub, working with his adult partner, completes 15 requirements within these areas to earn the Tiger Cub badge. These requirements consist of an exciting series of indoor and outdoor activities just right for a boy in the first grade.

Bobcat. The Bobcat rank is for all boys who join Cub Scouting.

Wolf. The Wolf program is for boys who have completed first grade (or are age 8). To earn the Wolf badge, a boy must pass 12 achievements involving simple physical and mental skills.

Bear. The Bear rank is for boys who have completed second grade (or are age 9). There are 24 Bear achievements in four categories. The Cub Scout must complete 12 of these to earn the Bear badge. These requirements are somewhat more difficult and challenging than those for Wolf rank.

Webelos. This program is for boys who have completed third grade (or are age 10). A boy may begin working on the Webelos badge as soon as he joins a Webelos den. This is the first step in his transition from the Webelos den to the Boy Scout troop. As he completes the requirements found in the Webelos Handbook, he will work on activity badges, attend meetings led by adults, and become familiar with the Boy Scout requirements—all leading to the Arrow of Light Award.

Activities

Cub Scouting means “doing.” Everything in Cub Scouting is designed to have the boys doing things. Activities are used to achieve the aims of Scouting—citizenship training, character development, and personal fitness.

Many of the activities happen right in the den and pack. The most important are the weekly den meetings and the monthly pack meetings.

Cub Scout Academics and Sports

The Cub Scout Academics and Sports program provides the opportunity for boys to learn new techniques, increase scholarship skills, develop sportsmanship, and have fun. Participation in the program allows boys to be recognized for physical fitness and talent-building activities.

Camping

Age-appropriate camping programs are packed with theme-oriented action that brings Tiger Cubs, Cub Scouts, and Webelos Scouts into the great out-of-doors. Day camping comes to the boy in his own area; resident camping is a four-day to weeklong experience in which Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts camp within a developed theme of adventure and excitement. Cub Scout pack families enjoy camping in local council camps and other council-approved campsites. Camping programs combine fun and excitement with doing one’s best, getting along with others, and developing an appreciation for ecology and the world of the outdoors.

Publications

Volunteers are informed of national news and events through Scouting magazine (circulation 900,000). Boys may subscribe to Boys’ Life magazine (circulation 1.3 million). Both are published by the Boy Scouts of America. Also available are a number of youth and leader publications, including the Tiger Cub Handbook, Wolf Handbook, Bear Handbook, Webelos Handbook, Cub Scout Leader Book, Cub Scout Program Helps, and Webelos Leader Guide.

Cub Scouting Ideals

Apart from the fun and excitement of Cub Scout activities, the Cub Scout Promise, the Law of the Pack, the Tiger Cub motto, and the Cub Scout sign, handshake, motto, and salute all teach good citizenship and contribute to a boy’s sense of belonging.

Cub Scout Promise

I, (name), promise to do my best To do my duty to God and my country, To help other people, and To obey the Law of the Pack.

Cub Scout Motto

Do Your Best.

Tiger Cub Motto

Search, Discover, Share.

Law of the Pack

The Cub Scout follows Akela. The Cub Scout helps the pack go. The pack helps the Cub Scout grow. The Cub Scout gives goodwill.

Colors

The Cub Scout colors are blue and gold. They have special meaning, which will help boys see beyond the fun of Cub Scouting to its ultimate goals.

The blue stands for truth and spirituality, steadfast loyalty, and the sky above. The gold stands for warm sunlight, good cheer, and happiness.

Boy Scouting


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Purpose of the BSA

The Boy Scouts of America was incorporated to provide a program for community organizations that offers effective character, citizenship, and personal fitness training for youth.

Specifically, the BSA endeavors to develop American citizens who are physically, mentally, and emotionally fit; have a high degree of self-reliance as evidenced in such qualities as initiative, courage, and resourcefulness; have personal values based on religious concepts; have the desire and skills to help others; understand the principles of the American social, economic, and governmental systems; are knowledgeable about and take pride in their American heritage and understand our nation’s role in the world; have a keen respect for the basic rights of all people; and are prepared to participate in and give leadership to American society.
Volunteer Scouters

Thousands of volunteer leaders, both men and women, are involved in the Boy Scouting program. They serve in a variety of jobs—everything from unit leaders to chairmen of troop committees, committee members, merit badge counselors, and chartered organization representatives.

Like other phases of the program, Boy Scouting is made available to community organizations having similar interests and goals. Chartered organizations include professional organizations; governmental bodies; and religious, educational, civic, fraternal, business, labor, and citizens’ groups. Each organization appoints one of its members as the chartered organization representative. The organization is responsible for leadership, the meeting place, and support for troop activities.

Who Pays for It?

Several groups are responsible for supporting Boy Scouting: the boy and his parents, the troop, the chartered organization, and the community. Boys are encouraged to earn money whenever possible to pay their own expenses, and they also contribute dues to their troop treasuries to pay for budgeted items. Troops obtain additional income by working on approved money-earning projects. The community, including parents, supports Scouting through the United Way, Friends of Scouting campaigns, bequests, and special contributions to the BSA local council. This income provides leadership training, outdoor programs, council service centers and other facilities, and professional service for units.
Aims and Methods of the Scouting Program

The Scouting program has three specific objectives, commonly referred to as the “Aims of Scouting.” They are character development, citizenship training, and personal fitness.

The methods by which the aims are achieved are listed below in random order to emphasize the equal importance of each.

Ideals

The ideals of Boy Scouting are spelled out in the Scout Oath, the Scout Law, the Scout motto, and the Scout slogan. The Boy Scout measures himself against these ideals and continually tries to improve. The goals are high, and as he reaches for them, he has some control over what and who he becomes.

Patrols

The patrol method gives Boy Scouts an experience in group living and participating citizenship. It places responsibility on young shoulders and teaches boys how to accept it. The patrol method allows Scouts to interact in small groups where members can easily relate to each other. These small groups determine troop activities through elected representatives.

Outdoor Programs

Boy Scouting is designed to take place outdoors. It is in the outdoor setting that Scouts share responsibilities and learn to live with one another. In the outdoors the skills and activities practiced at troop meetings come alive with purpose. Being close to nature helps Boy Scouts gain an appreciation for the beauty of the world around us. The outdoors is the laboratory in which Boy Scouts learn ecology and practice conservation of nature’s resources.

Advancement

Boy Scouting provides a series of surmountable obstacles and steps in overcoming them through the advancement method. The Boy Scout plans his advancement and progresses at his own pace as he meets each challenge. The Boy Scout is rewarded for each achievement, which helps him gain self-confidence. The steps in the advancement system help a Boy Scout grow in self-reliance and in the ability to help others.

Associations With Adults

Boys learn a great deal by watching how adults conduct themselves. Scout leaders can be positive role models for the members of the troop. In many cases a Scoutmaster who is willing to listen to boys, encourage them, and take a sincere interest in them can make a profound difference in their lives.

Personal Growth

As Boy Scouts plan their activities and progress toward their goals, they experience personal growth. The Good Turn concept is a major part of the personal growth method of Boy Scouting. Boys grow as they participate in community service projects and do Good Turns for others. Probably no device is as successful in developing a basis for personal growth as the daily Good Turn. The religious emblems program also is a large part of the personal growth method. Frequent personal conferences with his Scoutmaster help each Boy Scout to determine his growth toward Scouting’s aims.

Leadership Development

The Boy Scout program encourages boys to learn and practice leadership skills. Every Boy Scout has the opportunity to participate in both shared and total leadership situations. Understanding the concepts of leadership helps a boy accept the leadership role of others and guides him toward the citizenship aim of Scouting.

Uniform

The uniform makes the Boy Scout troop visible as a force for good and creates a positive youth image in the community. Boy Scouting is an action program, and wearing the uniform is an action that shows each Boy Scout’s commitment to the aims and purposes of Scouting. The uniform gives the Boy Scout identity in a world brotherhood of youth who believe in the same ideals. The uniform is practical attire for Boy Scout activities and provides a way for Boy Scouts to wear the badges that show what they have accomplished.

Outdoor Activities

Our council operates and maintains four Scout camps,

The BSA conducts a national Scout jamboree every four years and participates in world Scout jamborees (also held at four-year intervals). Fort A. P. Hill, Virginia, was the site of the 2001 National Scout Jamboree.

The Beginning of Scouting

Scouting, as known to millions of youth and adults, evolved during the early 1900s through the efforts of several men dedicated to bettering youth. These pioneers of the program conceived outdoor activities that developed skills in young boys and gave them a sense of enjoyment, fellowship, and a code of conduct for everyday living.

In this country and abroad at the turn of the century, it was thought that children needed certain kinds of education that the schools couldn’t or didn’t provide. This led to the formation of a variety of youth groups, many with the word “Scout” in their names. For example, Ernest Thompson Seton, an American naturalist, artist, writer, and lecturer, originated a group called the Woodcraft Indians and in 1902 wrote a guidebook for boys in his organization called the Birch Bark Roll. Meanwhile in Britain, Robert Baden-Powell, after returning to his country a hero following military service in Africa, found boys reading the manual he had written for his regiment on stalking and survival in the wild. Gathering ideas from Seton, America’s Daniel Carter Beard, and other Scoutcraft experts, Baden-Powell rewrote his manual as a nonmilitary skill book, which he titled Scouting for Boys. The book rapidly gained a wide readership in England and soon became popular in the United States. In 1907, when Baden-Powell held the first campout for Scouts on Brownsea Island off the coast of England, troops were spontaneously springing up in America.

William D. Boyce, a Chicago publisher, incorporated the Boy Scouts of America in 1910 after meeting with Baden-Powell. (Boyce was inspired to meet with the British founder by an unknown Scout who led him out of a dense London fog and refused to take a tip for doing a Good Turn.) Immediately after its incorporation, the BSA was assisted by officers of the YMCA in organizing a task force to help community organizations start and maintain a high-quality Scouting program. Those efforts climaxed in the organization of the nation’s first Scout camp at Lake George, New York, directed by Ernest Thompson Seton. Beard, who had established another youth group, the Sons of Daniel Boone (which he later merged with the BSA), provided assistance. Also on hand for this historic event was James E. West, a lawyer and an advocate of children’s rights, who later would become the first professional Chief Scout Executive of the Boy Scouts of America. Seton became the first volunteer national Chief Scout, and Beard, the first national Scout commissioner.

Publications

The BSA publishes the Boy Scout Handbook (more than 37.8 million copies of which have been printed); the Patrol Leader Handbook, which offers information relevant to boy leadership; the Scoutmaster Handbook; more than 100 merit badge pamphlets dealing with hobbies, vocations, and advanced Scoutcraft; and program features and various kinds of training, administrative, and organizational manuals for adult volunteer leaders and Boy Scouts. In addition, the BSA publishes Boys’ Life magazine, the national magazine for all boys (magazine circulation is more than 1.3 million) and Scouting magazine for volunteers, which has a circulation of over 1.1 million.

Conservation

Conservation activities supplement the program of Boy Scout advancement, summer camp, and outdoor activities and teach young people to better understand their interdependence with the environment.

Scout Law

TRUSTWORTHY
A Scout tells the truth. He keeps his promises. Honesty is part of his code of conduct. People can depend on him.

LOYAL
A Scout is true to his family, Scout leaders, friends, school, and nation.

HELPFUL
A Scout is concerned about other people. He does things willingly for others without pay or reward.

FRIENDLY
A Scout is a friend to all. He is a brother to other Scouts. He seeks to understand others. He respects those with ideas and customs other than his own.

COURTEOUS
A Scout is polite to everyone regardless of age or position. He knows good manners make it easier for people to get along together

Youth Protection Training (Effective 9/1/17)
Effective September 1, 2017, Youth Protection Training will be required for all adult leaders at the time of registration. Paper applications from new leaders must be accompanied by a Youth Protection Training completion certificate, which must be filed with the application.
Because completion of YPT is now required for all leaders at the time of registration, unit leaders must obtain copies of the completion certificates from the leaders who register online before approving their application.
With the upcoming renewal cycle, the Internet Rechartering system will be updated so that units cannot submit the registration renewal of any adult who does not have current YPT as of the effective date of the renewal. Completion of YPT as part of the online registration system will be required in a future update. Additionally, council registrars will no longer be able to override the registration system to register any leader whose Youth Protection Training is not current.
Effective for the 2018 BSA summer camp season, any adult accompanying a Boy Scout troop to a residence camp or other Scouting activity lasting 72 hours or more must be registered as a leader, including completion of a CBC and YPT, even if they are the parent of a youth on the trip.
Please Note: Although YPT is strongly encouraged for adults attending any overnight activity, at this time, the requirement applies only to individual adults staying three or more nights at a resident camp.

Membership Fee Increase (Effective 12/1/17)
The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Scout Law.
To do this — while delivering the nation’s foremost youth development program — the BSA must remain vigilant in controlling costs. Although we have been successful in reducing our expenditures in many areas, it has become necessary to evaluate our annual membership fees.
Based on feedback from both volunteers and employees, the BSA membership fee will increase to $33 for all registered youth and adult leaders, effective December 1, 2017.
Membership fees support the services that are necessary to provide Scouting to youth from 7 to 21 years of age. From education to high-adventure experiences you can’t get anyplace else, the BSA provides unique growth opportunities at a great value.
Services include primary liability coverage for all volunteer leaders and chartered organizations, ongoing advances in technology, fundraising support, new program development and membership recruiting strategies, and support materials. In 2016 alone, the BSA served 2.3 million youth members through approximately 270 local councils across the United States and its territories.
With the help of all of our volunteers and Scouting parents, we will continue accomplishing incredible things for young people and the communities we serve. Please see the attached “2017 Membership Fee Increase FINAL.docx” for more information, including a Q&A section.

2017 Membership Fee Increase  Q&A

The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

To do this — while delivering the nation’s foremost youth development program — the BSA must remain vigilant in controlling costs. Although we have been successful in reducing our expenditures in many areas, it has become necessary to evaluate our annual membership fees.

Based on feedback from both volunteers and employees, the BSA membership fee will increase to $33 for all registered youth and adult leaders, effective December 1, 2017.
Membership fees support the services that are necessary to provide Scouting to youth from 7 to 21 years of age. From education to high-adventure experiences you can’t get anyplace else, the BSA provides unique growth opportunities at a great value.

Services include primary liability coverage for all volunteer leaders and chartered organizations, ongoing advances in technology, fundraising support, new program development and membership recruiting strategies, and support materials. In 2016 alone, the BSA served 2.3 million youth members through approximately 270 local councils across the United States and its territories.

With the help of all of our volunteers and Scouting parents, we will continue accomplishing incredible things for young people and the communities we serve.

Questions and Answers:

1. Why are you increasing the membership fee? What is the additional money from the fees going to be used for?

To deliver the Scouting program to our 2.3 million youth members, it is occasionally necessary for the organization to increase membership fees to offset rising costs. As a result, the BSA is increasing our membership fee to $33 for all registered Scouts and adult members effective December 1, 2017.

Membership fees support the services that are necessary to provide Scouting programs to a growing number of youth. Services include ongoing advances in technology, council visits to assist in fundraising, program development and membership campaigns, liability insurance costs, and administrative costs. It is important that we continue to maintain a strong financial position in the future to support and grow Scouting.

2. What is directly contributing to the need for this increase?

There are a variety of factors taken into consideration, all of which have led to an increased cost of doing business.

3. When will the increase go into effect?

The membership fee change for all registered youth and adult leaders will go into effect December 1, 2017. This change will affect Cub Scout packs, Boy Scout troops, Venturing crews, Sea Scout ships, and Exploring posts/clubs. However, it will NOT apply to LDS-sponsored units, nor to those units with council-paid memberships. Note: All November and December 2017 recharters will have to renew at this new rate (since November recharter renewal actually spans from December 1, 2017, to November 30, 2018).

4. Does the BSA increase membership fees often?

There have been 10 fee increases in the organization’s history. Since 1969, the BSA has increased our fee, on average, every five years. The last membership increase took effect on January 1, 2014, and, prior to that, in 2010.

5. How much does it cost to be a Boy Scout?

All youth and adults who wish to become a member or leader of the Boy Scouts of America must pay the annual membership fee. Beyond that, families incur additional costs related to uniforms and the activities of their individual units.

6. Will the fee for Cub Scouts, Exploring, and Venturing/Sea Scouts increase as well?

Yes. This change will affect Cub Scout packs, Boy Scout troops, Venturing crews, Sea Scout ships, and Exploring posts/clubs. However, it will NOT apply to LDS-sponsored units, nor to those units with council-paid memberships.

7. Who gets the membership fee?

Local councils collect — and forward to the National Council — membership fees from each youth and adult who wishes to become a member of the Boy Scouts of America.

8. How is the National Council funded?

The National Council is funded through membership and service fees, investments, Boys’ Life magazine subscriptions, sales of uniforms and equipment, fees from national high-adventure bases, and contributions from individuals.

9. What does the National Council do for Scouting on the local level?

The BSA’s National Council provides program materials and support for approximately 270 local councils that administer the Scouting program, with each covering a specific geographic territory. The following are the key functions of the National Council:

 Provide training to local council volunteers and staff
 Maintain a national training center at Philmont Scout Ranch
 Develop and maintain four year-round national high-adventure bases and execute national events (jamborees, National Eagle Scout Association and Order of the Arrow conferences, and National Council meetings)
 Continue our leadership role in protecting our youth by providing youth protection resources, training, and criminal background checks for all registered volunteers and staff
 Provide local councils with program as well as tools for camp and office planning and evaluation, extensive financial counseling, planned giving and fundraising information, and professional personnel support
 Coordinate a communications network through magazines and literature (handbooks, merit badge pamphlets, brochures, training materials, and professional development training), including providing Scouting magazine to all registered leaders
 Make available uniforms, equipment, and program supplies
 Maintain and develop new relationships with chartered organizations that use the Scouting program (religious institutions, civic organizations, labor unions, professional organizations, business, and industry)
 Serve in a leadership role with Scouting associations in other countries as a member of the World Scout Conference
 Set and maintain program standards (e.g., advancement, health and safety, etc.) to ensure consistency of the brand throughout councils across the country

10. With the increase in membership fees, is Scouting still a good value?

The BSA has always taken into consideration the cost of delivering the Scouting program and has worked to keep our fees reasonable.

When you compare the BSA to other youth-serving organizations, we provide unique growth opportunities at a great value. The following are costs associated with other youth activities:

 Tackle football, $142: In Plano, Texas, second- through sixth-graders who play tackle football pay $140 for a three-month season. That fee doesn’t include equipment.
 Youth orchestra, $1,000: Members of the prestigious Los Angeles Youth Orchestra pay $100 to audition, $1,000 annually (if accepted), and must buy their own instruments.
 Select soccer, $400: In Cleveland, select youth soccer players ages 15 to 18 pay $400 a season, plus $180 for uniforms.
 Youth basketball, $525: In Queens, N.Y., boys ages 8 to 13 pay $525 a year, not including uniforms.
 4-H program, $25: Participants of the 4-H program in College Station, Texas, pay $25 a year, not including fees for individual activities.

From education to high-adventure, the Boy Scouts of America provides unique growth opportunities at a great value and we want all eligible youth to receive these benefits and participate in Scouting.

Youth Protection Training (Effective 9/1/17)
Effective September 1, 2017, Youth Protection Training will be required for all adult leaders at the time of registration. Paper applications from new leaders must be accompanied by a Youth Protection Training completion certificate, which must be filed with the application.
Because completion of YPT is now required for all leaders at the time of registration, unit leaders must obtain copies of the completion certificates from the leaders who register online before approving their application.
With the upcoming renewal cycle, the Internet Rechartering system will be updated so that units cannot submit the registration renewal of any adult who does not have current YPT as of the effective date of the renewal. Completion of YPT as part of the online registration system will be required in a future update. Additionally, council registrars will no longer be able to override the registration system to register any leader whose Youth Protection Training is not current.
Effective for the 2018 BSA summer camp season, any adult accompanying a Boy Scout troop to a residence camp or other Scouting activity lasting 72 hours or more must be registered as a leader, including completion of a CBC and YPT, even if they are the parent of a youth on the trip.
Please Note: Although YPT is strongly encouraged for adults attending any overnight activity, at this time, the requirement applies only to individual adults staying three or more nights at a resident camp.

Membership Fee Increase (Effective 12/1/17)
The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Scout Law.
To do this — while delivering the nation’s foremost youth development program — the BSA must remain vigilant in controlling costs. Although we have been successful in reducing our expenditures in many areas, it has become necessary to evaluate our annual membership fees.
Based on feedback from both volunteers and employees, the BSA membership fee will increase to $33 for all registered youth and adult leaders, effective December 1, 2017.
Membership fees support the services that are necessary to provide Scouting to youth from 7 to 21 years of age. From education to high-adventure experiences you can’t get anyplace else, the BSA provides unique growth opportunities at a great value.
Services include primary liability coverage for all volunteer leaders and chartered organizations, ongoing advances in technology, fundraising support, new program development and membership recruiting strategies, and support materials. In 2016 alone, the BSA served 2.3 million youth members through approximately 270 local councils across the United States and its territories.
With the help of all of our volunteers and Scouting parents, we will continue accomplishing incredible things for young people and the communities we serve. Please see the attached “2017 Membership Fee Increase FINAL.docx” for more information, including a Q&A section.

2017 Membership Fee Increase  Q&A

The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

To do this — while delivering the nation’s foremost youth development program — the BSA must remain vigilant in controlling costs. Although we have been successful in reducing our expenditures in many areas, it has become necessary to evaluate our annual membership fees.

Based on feedback from both volunteers and employees, the BSA membership fee will increase to $33 for all registered youth and adult leaders, effective December 1, 2017.
Membership fees support the services that are necessary to provide Scouting to youth from 7 to 21 years of age. From education to high-adventure experiences you can’t get anyplace else, the BSA provides unique growth opportunities at a great value.

Services include primary liability coverage for all volunteer leaders and chartered organizations, ongoing advances in technology, fundraising support, new program development and membership recruiting strategies, and support materials. In 2016 alone, the BSA served 2.3 million youth members through approximately 270 local councils across the United States and its territories.

With the help of all of our volunteers and Scouting parents, we will continue accomplishing incredible things for young people and the communities we serve.

Questions and Answers:

1. Why are you increasing the membership fee? What is the additional money from the fees going to be used for?

To deliver the Scouting program to our 2.3 million youth members, it is occasionally necessary for the organization to increase membership fees to offset rising costs. As a result, the BSA is increasing our membership fee to $33 for all registered Scouts and adult members effective December 1, 2017.

Membership fees support the services that are necessary to provide Scouting programs to a growing number of youth. Services include ongoing advances in technology, council visits to assist in fundraising, program development and membership campaigns, liability insurance costs, and administrative costs. It is important that we continue to maintain a strong financial position in the future to support and grow Scouting.

2. What is directly contributing to the need for this increase?

There are a variety of factors taken into consideration, all of which have led to an increased cost of doing business.

3. When will the increase go into effect?

The membership fee change for all registered youth and adult leaders will go into effect December 1, 2017. This change will affect Cub Scout packs, Boy Scout troops, Venturing crews, Sea Scout ships, and Exploring posts/clubs. However, it will NOT apply to LDS-sponsored units, nor to those units with council-paid memberships. Note: All November and December 2017 recharters will have to renew at this new rate (since November recharter renewal actually spans from December 1, 2017, to November 30, 2018).

4. Does the BSA increase membership fees often?

There have been 10 fee increases in the organization’s history. Since 1969, the BSA has increased our fee, on average, every five years. The last membership increase took effect on January 1, 2014, and, prior to that, in 2010.

5. How much does it cost to be a Boy Scout?

All youth and adults who wish to become a member or leader of the Boy Scouts of America must pay the annual membership fee. Beyond that, families incur additional costs related to uniforms and the activities of their individual units.

6. Will the fee for Cub Scouts, Exploring, and Venturing/Sea Scouts increase as well?

Yes. This change will affect Cub Scout packs, Boy Scout troops, Venturing crews, Sea Scout ships, and Exploring posts/clubs. However, it will NOT apply to LDS-sponsored units, nor to those units with council-paid memberships.

7. Who gets the membership fee?

Local councils collect — and forward to the National Council — membership fees from each youth and adult who wishes to become a member of the Boy Scouts of America.

8. How is the National Council funded?

The National Council is funded through membership and service fees, investments, Boys’ Life magazine subscriptions, sales of uniforms and equipment, fees from national high-adventure bases, and contributions from individuals.

9. What does the National Council do for Scouting on the local level?

The BSA’s National Council provides program materials and support for approximately 270 local councils that administer the Scouting program, with each covering a specific geographic territory. The following are the key functions of the National Council:

 Provide training to local council volunteers and staff
 Maintain a national training center at Philmont Scout Ranch
 Develop and maintain four year-round national high-adventure bases and execute national events (jamborees, National Eagle Scout Association and Order of the Arrow conferences, and National Council meetings)
 Continue our leadership role in protecting our youth by providing youth protection resources, training, and criminal background checks for all registered volunteers and staff
 Provide local councils with program as well as tools for camp and office planning and evaluation, extensive financial counseling, planned giving and fundraising information, and professional personnel support
 Coordinate a communications network through magazines and literature (handbooks, merit badge pamphlets, brochures, training materials, and professional development training), including providing Scouting magazine to all registered leaders
 Make available uniforms, equipment, and program supplies
 Maintain and develop new relationships with chartered organizations that use the Scouting program (religious institutions, civic organizations, labor unions, professional organizations, business, and industry)
 Serve in a leadership role with Scouting associations in other countries as a member of the World Scout Conference
 Set and maintain program standards (e.g., advancement, health and safety, etc.) to ensure consistency of the brand throughout councils across the country

10. With the increase in membership fees, is Scouting still a good value?

The BSA has always taken into consideration the cost of delivering the Scouting program and has worked to keep our fees reasonable.

When you compare the BSA to other youth-serving organizations, we provide unique growth opportunities at a great value. The following are costs associated with other youth activities:

 Tackle football, $142: In Plano, Texas, second- through sixth-graders who play tackle football pay $140 for a three-month season. That fee doesn’t include equipment.
 Youth orchestra, $1,000: Members of the prestigious Los Angeles Youth Orchestra pay $100 to audition, $1,000 annually (if accepted), and must buy their own instruments.
 Select soccer, $400: In Cleveland, select youth soccer players ages 15 to 18 pay $400 a season, plus $180 for uniforms.
 Youth basketball, $525: In Queens, N.Y., boys ages 8 to 13 pay $525 a year, not including uniforms.
 4-H program, $25: Participants of the 4-H program in College Station, Texas, pay $25 a year, not including fees for individual activities.

From education to high-adventure, the Boy Scouts of America provides unique growth opportunities at a great value and we want all eligible youth to receive these benefits and participate in Scouting.

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RSVP Today 

 Celebrate the historic 75th anniversary of Camp Josepho by earning a merit badge in a single day. 

Saturday, September 24, 2016  9:30 am – 3:30 pm

Badges offered – Indian Lore & Scouting Heritage

 Time: Scouts will arrive at 9:30 for check in. Lunch is provided Scouts are also welcome to stay for dinner if they would like.
Cost: $35 Location: Please see campjosepho.org  for directions.

Each Merit Badge will require pre-work in order for the Scouts to earn the badge during the workshop. Please see below for pre-work to be done. To register visit http://bsa-la.doubleknot.com/event/camp-josepho-75th-anniversary-celebration/1964641  

And select “Day Including Merit Badge” along with the quantity of Scouts.

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Everyone gets to experience the fun and charm of Camp Josepho!

There will be other activities taking place during the weekend. We highly encourage parents and siblings to attend and enjoy guided hikes, Archery, BB, Rifle, Tomahawk, Scoutcraft or cool off in the pool. Saturday activities are open to anyone not just Scouts so bring the whole family down for the day and leave the cooking to us!

Feel free to contact Ryan Peterson if you need more information at Ryan.Peterson@scouting.org or 818.933.0106 or Joe Pizzo at 818.785.8700

Prerequisites for Scouting Heritage 

Things to remember to bring for Class:

  •  Merit Badge Blue Card properly filled out and signed off by your Scoutmaster
  • Scouting Heritage Merit Badge Pamphlet  http://www.scouting.org/filestore/Merit_Badge_ReqandRes/Scouting_Heritage.pdf
  •  Scout Uniform
  •  Supporting documentation or project work pertinent to this merit badge which may also include a Merit Badge Workbook for reference with notes
  • A positive Scouting focus and attitude

Following is an outline of the class to help you prepare.  Note that Scouts will be signed off only on those requirements that the Merit Badge Counselor determines meets the requirements; no more no less  This Merit Badge should not be expected to be earned without preparation and work

5. Learn about the history of your unit or Scouting in your area. Interview at least two people (one from the past and one from the present) associated with your troop. These individuals could be adult unit leaders, Scouts, troop committee members, or representatives of your troop’s chartered organization. Find out when your unit was originally chartered. Create a report of your findings on the history of your troop, and present it to your patrol or troop or at a court of honor, and then add it to the troop’s library. This presentation could be in the form of an oral/written report, an exhibit, a scrapbook, or a computer presentation such as a slide show

Half of this requirement will need to be done prior to attending the class. Scouts will have an opportunity to present their work on this requirement in the class in order to potentially complete the other half of this requirement. Scouts should review this requirement completely and be prepared with and bring their presentation, report, exhibit, or scrapbook. Scouts will have an opportunity to share their work during the class. Only Scouts with the first part of this requirement completed PRIOR to the class and ready for presentation will have the opportunity of possibly finishing this requirement in the class.

 6. Make a collection of some of your personal patches and other Scouting memorabilia. With their permission, you may include items borrowed from family members or friends who have been in Scouting in the past, or you may include photographs of these items. Show this collection to your counselor, and share what you have learned about items in the collection. (There is no requirement regarding how large or small this collection must be

Scouts desiring to get signed off on this requirement on the day of the class will need to prepare ahead of time their collection of Scouting patches or other Scouting memorabilia and bring their collection with them to class. Scouts should be ready to share with the class and counselor their collection. 

 

 

Indian Lore Merit Badge

Things to remember to bring for Class:

  •  Merit Badge Blue Card properly filled out and signed off by your Scoutmaster
  • Scouting Heritage Merit Badge Pamphlet  http://www.usscouts.org/usscouts/mb/worksheets/Indian-Lore.pdf
  •  Scout Uniform
  •  Supporting documentation or project work pertinent to this merit badge which may also include a Merit Badge Workbook for reference with notes
  • A positive Scouting focus and attitude

One Prerequisite:

Have your boy research ONE of the following and bring to our meeting (hopefully they will chose several different ones so that it is more interesting to share).

  1. Write or briefly describe how life would have been different for the European settlers if there had been no native Americans to meet them when they came to this continent.
  2. Sing two songs in an Indian language. Explain their meaning.
  3. Learn in an Indian language at least 25 common terms and their meanings.
  4. Show 25 signs in Indian sign language. Include those that will help you ask for water, for food, and where the path or road leads.
  5. Learn in English (or the language you commonly speak at home or in the troop) an Indian story of at least 250 words, or any number of shorter ones adding up to 300 words. Tell the story or stories at a Scout meeting or campfire.
  6. Write or tell about eight things adopted by others from American Indians.
  7. Learn 25 Indian place names. Tell their origins and meanings.
  8. Name five well-known American Indian leaders, either from the past or people of today. Give their tribes or nations. Describe what they did or do now that makes them notable.
  9. Learn about the Iroquois Confederacy, including how and why it was formed. Tell about its governing system. Describe some of the similarities and differences between the governments of the United States and of the Six Nations (the Haudenosaunee or Iroquois Confederacy).

 

 

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To RSVP, visit: CampJosepho.org  or

Ryan.Peterson@scouting.org or 818.933.0106

RSVP before we’re at capacity!

Let people you know you are attending tag us on Like us on FacebookView on Instagram

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 RSVP NOW 

 Come celebrate the historic return of the NFL to LA while raising funds to help support Cub Scouts. Watch the LA Rams take on the 49ers on a outdoor screen at this special viewing party.

Monday, September 12th at 6:30pm

4910 Topeka Drive, Tarzana, CA 91356 

 Food, Drinks, Football and Games!

Putting Contest, Wine Pull, Silent Auction

Proceeds support Scouting in our community. Suggested Donation:$100

(Cost to fund one Cub Scout annually is $260)

Home of Sean Michaels

Food, Beverage and Valet Parking Provided

To RSVP, visit: rams.kintera.org  or

Ryan.Peterson@scouting.org or 818.933.0106

RSVP before we’re at capacity!

Let people you know you are attending tag us on Like us on FacebookView on Instagram

Check out our full interview with Acker and the members of the WLACC troop below!

During the day, you can watch Tanya Acker litigate on the television series “Hot Bench” but in her off hours, there’s a chance you may run into her at the Battleship Iowa Museum in the Los Angeles Harbor.

The LA native is a strong supporter of the American history landmark and sits on its Board of Trustees and she took the opportunity to share her passion during an exclusive interview with GoodCelebrity.com.

“This ship embodies a lot of American history and a lot of what’s great about this country. It’s a living reminder of that,” she said.

“It’s also a place where kids can get STEM education. It’s a museum, but it’s still an operating battleship,” Tanya added.

The Iowa is operated by the nonprofit Pacific Battleship Center (PBC) and opened to the public on July 7, 2012 as an interactive naval museum.

According to its website, the waterfront museum is “dedicated to ‘Celebrating the American Spirit’ through the preservation and interpretation. By sharing the accomplishments and sacrifices of American patriots and engaging visitors in unique and exciting ways PBC brings the ship to life by connecting the past with the future.”

“As a feat of engineering, it’s really impressive and amazing so it’s really good for us to be able to share that with local school kids,” said Joshua Stutz, Education Manager at the museum.

Tanya works closely with the Western County Council of the Boy Scouts of America as their legal advisor and program participant. She brings troop members to the Iowa on a regular basis to get them involved in the museum’s enrichment activities and educational opportunities.

During our trip to the museum with Tanya, Andrew Sisolak, Director of Field Service WLACC Boy Scouts, told us, “Tanya’s been a tremendous advocate and supporter of scouting and especially reaching out to underserved communities in our scouting outreach programs.”

The scouts perform citizen training, which prepares them for adult life and how to become a great leader in their communities. Sisolak said that the Iowa is great resource to incorporate into the training because it ties them “back in time with US History, the people who served and provided for the future they now live in, provides continuity and really gives them a chance to experientially learn about their past, which in turn, influences their future.”

Murad Elmassry, a youth member of the Sea Scouts division of WLACC said, “The youth nowadays are indoors and on their phones and it’s good for them to get out and experience the world.”

According to a study from Baylor University, Eagle Scouts are significantly more likely to be involved in extracurricular activities than non-scouts. These activities include camping, hiking, fishing, attending theatre shows, and playing a musical instrument. In addition, more than 58% of scouts get at least 30 minutes of physical activity each day compared to only 18% of non-scouts.

Acker is a huge fan of the scouts and believes that it teaches young men and women common sense, community service, and how to be an overall better person. She believes that everyone would benefit from the lessons taught.

“I love my job, but if there’s one great wish I had it would be that there are fewer people in court. I would actually like to see fewer fights,” Acker said.

Check out our full interview with Acker and the members of the WLACC troop below!

 

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Luncheon and Panel Discussion

Thursday | June 9 | 12 pm
300 Delfern Dr., Los Angeles, CA 90077

Join us for an intimate garden luncheon and panel showcasing top influencers in the medical, entertainment, political and Scouting fields.

Honorees

Elaine Paulf945050a-b265-48b0-8ec2-ce720e83ea9c
Chief Financial Officer of Hulu.

Elaine Paul is the Chief Financial Officer, Strategy & Business Development at Hulu. As CFO she partners with Hulu’s executive management team, CEO, and Board of Directors to drive growth and efficiency at one of the fastest growing streaming media companies.  Elaine joined Hulu in 2013.

Prior to joining Hulu, Elaine served as Senior Vice President of Corporate Strategy at the Walt Disney Company where she led various acquisitions, new business initiatives, and strategic investments, including Disney’s original investment in Hulu in 2009. In addition to her tenure in Corporate Strategy, she previously served as Vice President, Business Development for the Walt Disney Internet Group where she led a team responsible for developing strategic partnerships and increasing monetization of the online assets of the company.

Prior to her time at Disney, Elaine worked as an Associate at McKinsey & Company and a Financial Analyst at Morgan Stanley & Company. Elaine holds an MBA from the Harvard Business School and a degree in Economics and History from Stanford University.

Elaine is married to Darren Seidel and has three children ages 12, 11, and 8.  Elaine enjoys the outdoors, standup paddle surfing, hiking, and adventure travel.  Darren was an Eagle Scout and their son Will is a first year Scout in Troop 223.

 

 

Kathy E. Magliato, MD, MBA,FACS 
Dr. Magliato is one of the few female cardiothoracic surgeons in the world. She founded and directed a Multidisciplinary Women’s Health Center to address the cardiac needs of female patients at Providence Saint John’s Medical Center in Santa Monica, CA, where she is currently on staff. Prior to joining Saint John’s Medical Center, Dr. Magliato was a heart/lung transplant surgeon and Director of the Mechanical Assist Device Program at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Her memoir HEART MATTERS has been made into the NBC medical drama, HEARTBEAT.

Bettina Duval 

Founder and President of CALIFORNIALIST

Founder and President of CALIFORNIALIST, a political action committee to elect women in California, in 2002. CALIFORNIALIST has helped elect over 60 women to California State government. Five of CALIFORNIALIST’s candidates, whose careers were nurtured early on by the CALIFORNIALIST, are now serving in Congress. Bettina believes that it is important to build a pipeline of qualified women in order to achieve equality in our government.

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Sandra Spagnoli

Chief of Police, Beverly Hills

Spagnoli started with the San Carlos Police Department in 1983 as an explorer, before being hired as a full-time officer in 1990. She was promoted to sergeant in 1996 and commander in 1998. She was chief of the Benicia Police Department for four years before being named San Leandro Police Chief in 2011.

Spangoli – who holds a Master’s Degree in Public Administration and a Bachelor’s Degree in Human Services Management –has attended the FBI Academy, FBI Law Enforcement Executive Development Seminar, the Los Angeles Police Department Leadership Academy, Executive Leaders Program at the Naval Postgraduate School/Center for Homeland Security and Defense and POST Command College. She has been an instructor at the LAPD’s Leadership Academy since 2000.

Reserve your seat before we’re sold out!

REGISTER TODAY CLICK HERE!

 

 

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Merit Badge Sponsors


Want to Learn More?

If you would like more information on sponsoring a Merit Badge, contact R.C. Peterson  818.933.0106.

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Merit Badge List:
The following is a list of all of the Merit Badges, arranged into logical fields of activity (categories). 

Agribusiness
Animal Science, Farm Mechanics, Plant Science

Arts And Humanities
Art, Basketry, Bugling, Leatherwork, Metalwork, Music, Pottery, Sculpture, Theater, Wood Carving

Business And Industry
American Business, Entrepreneurship, Pulp & Paper, Salesmanship, Textile

Conservation
Environmental Science
, Fish & Wildlife Management, Forestry, Soil & Water Conservation, Sustainability

Hobbies
Backpacking, Camping, Chess, Coin Collecting, Collections, Cooking, Dog Care, Gardening, Hiking, Home Repairs, Indian Lore, Model Design and Building, Pets, Pioneering, Radio, Rowing, Scouting Heritage, Stamp Collecting

Natural Science
Archaeology, Astronomy, Bird Study, Geology, Insect Study, Mammal Study, Nature, Oceanography, Reptile & Amphibian Study, Weather

Communications
Communication, Cinematography, Journalism, Photography

Personal Development
American Cultures, American Heritage, Citizenship In the Community, Citizenship In the Nation, Citizenship In the World, Communications, Disabilities Awareness, Family Life, Genealogy, Personal Fitness, Personal Management, Public Speaking, Reading, Scholarship, Traffic Safety, Wilderness Survival

Physical Science
Chemistry, Computers, Electricity, Electronics, Energy, Nuclear Science, Space Exploration

Professions
Architecture, Dentistry, Engineering, Inventing, Landscape Architecture, Law, Medicine, Robotics, Surveying, Veterinary Medicine, Welding

Public Service
Crime Prevention, Emergency Preparedness, Fingerprinting, Fire Safety, First Aid, Lifesaving, Public Health, Safety, Search & Rescue

Sports
Archery, Athletics, Canoeing, Climbing, Cycling, Fishing, Fly Fishing, Golf, Geocaching, Horsemanship, Kayaking, Motorboating, Orienteering, Rifle Shooting, Scuba Diving, Shotgun Shooting, Skating

Water And Snow
Sailing, Snow Sports, Sports, Swimming, Water Sports, Whitewater

Trades
American Labor, Automotive Maintenance, Composite Materials, Drafting, Graphic Arts, Painting, Plumbing, Woodwork

Transportation
Aviation, Railroading, Truck Transportation

 

National Jamboree


The Boy Scout National Jamboree is held every four years. Because of the age restrictions, most Scouts only get one opportunity to attend this unbelievable event as a Boy Scout. So if you are interested, don’t put this off!! What is a Jamboree?

In 1916, Sir Robert Baden-Powell, founder of the Scouting movement, knew what success looked like for the 10th anniversary of Scouting. It was the sight of thousands of youth gathered together to celebrate. The jamboree was born! In his words, “The secret of its growth lies in that indeterminate force which we only know as the ‘Scout Spirit,’ and grow it has!” Since 1937, more than 654,000 Scouts and leaders have shared the jamboree experience and hiked the trails, paths, and roadways at previous national Scout jamborees. Now, it’s your turn to celebrate! It is the opportunity of a lifetime, one you will never forget. DON’T MISS OUT on this special moment in time! A jamboree is truly a Scouts mountain-top experience.

Tour and Travel Plans

Troop “A”—The “Behind the Scenes of America – The GO BIG GET WILD TOUR”

Departs Los Angeles July 8th, 2013.

This exciting tour focuses on visiting behind the scenes of manufacturing, research, entertainment, government, military, educational and other select locations not normally accessible to the public. We will be touring amazing and historic places in the Philadelphia area, Washington, D.C., Orlando, Florida, Cape Canaveral, Florida and the Bahamas. A few highlights include touring the US. Mint, Independence Hall, Hershey’s Chocolate World & Theme Park, Smithsonian Museums, Ford’s Theater, White House, Ft. McHenry, Baltimore Orioles Game, Monticello, US Naval Academy, Harley Davidson Motorcycle Factory and more. This once and a lifetime tour will also visit the Islands of Adventure Amusement Park (Hogwart’s Castle & Village and Harry Potter Adventure Ride), The Animal Kingdom Park (behind the scenes), Gatorland and includes a tour of the Kennedy Space Center (with special lunch with an astronaut) plus a cruise to the Bahamas to BSA reef snorkel and more!!! Parents and families may join in on the fun and attend the portion of this troop’s tour beginning on July 24th, 2013 in Florida and the Bahamas, for a separate price to be determined. Troop A returns to Los Angeles on July 31st, 2013.

Cost $5,995.00 (app. $375 per month)

Troop “B”—The “Passport Required Tour”

Departs July 5th, 2013 with visits to the CN Tower, Royal Ontario Museum, Casa Loma Castle, Niagara Falls, the Baseball Hall of Fame, key sites in New York (Nintendo World, 9/11 Memorial, and a Broadway show), Philadelphia, Lancaster to check out the Amish way of life, Hershey (Founders Hall, Hershey’s Chocolate World), and Gettysburg Visitor Center and Museum. Then off to the 2013 Jamboree at the Summit Bechtel Scout Reserve, West Virginia. After the Jamboree we will check out the Hazy Center and then catch an afternoon flight home.

Cost $5,830(app. $360 per month)

Venturing Crew “E”—The “Ad—Venture Tour”

Departs July 5, 2013 to Philadelphia, PA. We’ll take the historical Spirit of ‘76 Ghost Tour, explore the Constitution Tour on a cool Segway, visit Amish Country in Lancaster, and participate in 150th Anniversary Gettysburg re– enactment. Then on to New York City to sail aboard the Clipper City, 158 foot schooner in the Manhattan Bay, visit the Empire State Building, Central Park Bike Tour, 911 Memorial, Times Square, and a Broadway show! Next, we’ll visit The Smithsonian, Washington Monument, Lincoln Memorial, and the Mall in Washington DC. Then meet with a Congressman and a private tour of the Capital. Then explore the Potomac river around Washington, DC on a kayak. Take a trip through time to Colonial Williamsburg with a day of fun at Bush Gardens. Get on board The Batteau, the re-enactment of Tom Sawyer’s overnight boat tour to a private island in Lynchburg, VA. Finally, we’ll have 10 exciting days at the Jamboree where the Venturers will get to repel, scuba dive, rock climb, white water raft, and many more fun activities. After the Jamboree we’ll visit Winston-Salem and Raleigh, NC before we return home on July 25th, 2013.

Cost $4,788(app. $285 per month)